Videos (Download & Post)

  • Wanna Join? New users you can now register lightning fast using your Facebook or Twitter accounts.
May 7, 2013
9,708
14,167
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz


from wiki:
The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of racial attacks in 1943 in Los Angeles, California, United States, between Mexican American youths and European American servicemen stationed in Southern California. White servicemen and civilians attacked Mexican youths who wore zoot suits because they were considered unpatriotic and luxurious during wartime, in which rationing was required for the World War II war effort. While most of the violence was toward the Mexican youth, young African American and Filipino/Filipino Americans were attacked as well because they also sported zoot suits.[1] The Zoot Suit Riots were related to fears and hostilities aroused by the coverage of the Sleepy Lagoon murder trial, following the killing of a young Latino man in a barrio near Los Angeles. The riot appeared to trigger similar attacks that year against Latinos in Chicago, San Diego, Oakland, Evansville, Philadelphia, and New York City.[2]
 

BUTCHER 206

FREE BUTCHER206
Aug 22, 2003
11,945
108,504
113
Seattle, WA
Before you do it seems like this version skips parts so try this

HyperNormalisation
Damn this shit is pretty interesting... I didn't think I'd get into it but it's fascinating

Thanks for sharing it it's starting to help me click all these floating ideas I've had for a minute during this election into something more clear
 
Jan 31, 2008
2,794
3,384
113
39
Damn this shit is pretty interesting... I didn't think I'd get into it but it's fascinating

Thanks for sharing it it's starting to help me click all these floating ideas I've had for a minute during this election into something more clear
If you liked that and haven't seen the Century of the Self I highly recommend you do so

 
Jan 31, 2008
2,794
3,384
113
39
[ame]https://vimeo.com/95735800[/ame]

Nestled deep within the foothills of the Himalayas, Jhamtse Gatsai is one of the most extraordinary and inspiring communities you're likely to witness. It's led by Buddhist Monk Lobsang, a renowned spiritual teacher who works to create a reality of love and acceptance for children who have been abused or orphaned. Tashi and the Monk follows that mission as it relates to one of the newest arrivals to his commune - a reluctant five-year old girl who's endured unimaginable neglect and tragedy during her brief life. By the time Tashi enters the community, she has suffered the death of her mother and abandonment by her alcoholic father. The youngest resident, she is ill-tempered and aggressive with many of her adolescent co-habitants.

Lobsang's approach does not rely on professional psychologists, prescription medications or any of the often misguided remedies set forth by modern medicine. He's more interested in building an environment that nourishes the soul. With tremendous patience and a graceful, calming manner, he empowers Tashi and the more than 80 additional children under his counsel to appreciate the gift that is their lives. He infuses them with a generosity of spirit and a shared sense of purpose, and unlocks within them an awareness of their own potential.

Tashi's journey is intercut with scenes of Lobsang as he rallies the support of his teenaged residents to act as mentors to the newcomers, and as he gently declines the pleas of several families who beg for his assistance with their own wayward children. He's operating on limited resources, and he cannot jeopardize the delicate sanctity of the environment he's cultivated. We learn of the struggles he suffered through his own suppressive upbringing, and his initial inspirations for creating the commune after serving under the tutelage of the Dalai Lama.

From the splendid photography of its awe-inspiring natural setting to its appealing musical score, the technical aspects of the film are uniformly impressive. But the beating heart of Tashi and the Monk - and the reason why it will linger with viewers long after its conclusion - is the rare opportunity to see a child find her hope again. It's a touching tribute to the transformative power of compassion.
 
May 7, 2013
9,708
14,167
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
CIA DICTATING HOLLYWOOD FILMS


Early life and education

Pieczenik was born in Cuba of Jewish parents from Russia and Poland and was raised in France.[2] His father, a doctor from Dombrovicz who studied and worked in Toulouse, France,[3] fled Poland before World War II. His mother, a Russian Jew from Białystok, Poland,[3] fled Europe after many of her family members were killed. The couple met in Portugal, where both had fled ahead of the Nazi invaders.[3] Pieczenik was born in Cuba in 1943.[3][4] After living in Toulouse for six years, Pieczenik's family migrated to the United States, where they settled in the Harlem area[3] of New York City, New York.[5] Steve Pieczenik was 8 years old when his parents received their entry visa to the United States.[3]

Pieczenik is a classical pianist and wrote a full-length musical at the age of 8.[4]

Pieczenik is a Harvard University-trained psychiatrist and has a doctorate in international relations from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).[3]

Pieczenik's autobiography notes that he attended Booker T. Washington High School in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. Pieczenik received a full scholarship to Cornell University at the age of 16.[3] According to Pieczenik, he received a BA degree in Pre-Medicine and Psychology from Cornell in 1964, and later attended Cornell University Medical College. He attained his PhD in international relations from MIT while studying at Harvard Medical School.[4] Pieczenik claims to be the first psychiatrist ever to receive a PhD focusing on international relations.[5]

While performing his psychiatry residency at Harvard, he was awarded the Harry E. Solomon award for his paper titled: "The hierarchy of ego-defense mechanisms in foreign policy decision making".[3]

An article written by Pieczenik, "Psychological dimensions of international dependency", appears in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol 132(4), Apr 1975, 428-431.[6]
Professional life

Pieczenik was Deputy Assistant Secretary of State under Henry Kissinger, Cyrus Vance and James Baker.[3] His expertise includes foreign policy, international crisis management and psychological warfare.[7] He served the presidential administrations of Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush in the capacity of deputy assistant secretary.[8]

In 1974, Pieczenik joined the United States Department of State as a consultant to help in the restructuring of its Office for the Prevention of Terrorism.[2]

In 1976, Pieczenik was made Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for management.[2][5][9][10]

At the Department of State, he served as a "specialist on hostage taking".[11] He has been credited with devising successful negotiating strategies and tactics used in several high-profile hostage situations, including the 1976 TWA Flight 355 hostage situation and the 1977 kidnapping of the son of Cyprus' president.[2] He was involved in negotiations for the release of Aldo Moro after Moro was kidnapped.[12] As a renowned psychiatrist, he was utilized as a press source for early information on the mental state of the hostages involved in the Iran hostage crisis after they were freed.[13] In 1977, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Mary McGrory described Stephen Pieczenik as "one of the most 'brilliantly competent' men in the field of terrorism".[14] He worked "side by side" with Police Chief Maurice J. Cullinane in the Washington, D.C. command center of Mayor Walter Washington during the 1977 Hanafi Siege.[15] In 1978, Pieczenik was known as "a psychiatrist and political scientist in the U.S. Department of State whose credentials and experiences are probably unique among officials handling terrorist situations".[2]

On September 17, 1978 the Camp David Accords were signed. Pieczenik was at the secret Camp David negotiations leading up to the signing of the Accords. He worked out strategy and tactics based on psychopolitical dynamics. He correctly predicted that given their common backgrounds, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin would get along.[3]

In 1979, he resigned as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State over the handling of the Iranian hostage crisis.[4]

In the early 1980s, Pieczenik wrote an article for The Washington Post in which he claimed to have heard a senior U.S. official in the Department of State Operations Center give permission for the attack that led to the death of U.S. Ambassador Adolph Dubs in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 1979.[16]

Pieczenik got to know Syrian President Hafez al-Assad well during his 20 years in the Department of State.[3]

In 1982, Pieczenik was mentioned in an article in The New York Times as "a psychiatrist who has treated C.I.A. employees".[17]

In 2001, Pieczenik operated as chief executive officer of Strategic Intelligence Associates, a consulting firm.[18]

Pieczenik has been affiliated in a professional capacity as a psychiatrist with the National Institute of Mental Health.[19]

In 2011, Pieczenik began making appearances on The Alex Jones Show,[20] InfoWars.com, which led to numerous subsequent interviews.[21]

Pieczenik has consulted with the United States Institute of Peace and the RAND Corporation.[22]

Pieczenik began mentorship of Drew Paul, founder of Blabor.com.[23] Blabor.com is now the production company responsible for Pieczenik's web and media releases.[24][25]

As recently as October 6, 2012, Pieczenik was listed as a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR).[26] According to Internet Archive, his name was removed from the CFR roster sometime between October 6 and November 18, 2012.[27] Publicly, Pieczenik no longer appears as a member of the CFR.[28]

Pieczenik is fluent in five languages, including Russian, Spanish and French.[2][3][4]

Pieczenik has lectured at the National Defense University.[7]