US Incarceration

  • Wanna Join? New users you can now register lightning fast using your Facebook or Twitter accounts.
Dec 25, 2003
12,458
217
0
64
#21
Money isn't the reason so many people are getting locked up. Americans are fat, lazy, and stupid. The poorest of our poor have it better than the middle class of many 2nd or 3rd world countries.

They blame everyone else for their problems. People want money and success the same way they can microwave a Tyson chicken dinner,and when they don't get it, they act out.

If Americans had the same fire and determination as people from poor countries, none of this would be an issue. America's problems in general fall in the same category as white people problems - unnecessary bullshitting. People would literally kill to be in our shoes. And what do we do with our great gift of prosperity?

We eat McDonald's and read about Kim Kardashian.
 
Dec 25, 2003
12,458
217
0
64
#22
In short, our real issue is psychic or spiritual or however you would describe it.

We are still the richest country in the world. We should be better educated, more forward thinking. We should be ahead in science, technology, education and social and health metrics. Instead we are essentially lazy, mindless slugs.
 
Last edited:
May 7, 2013
9,724
14,171
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#23
Federal Prison Population Grows 27 Percent in 10 Years
Federal Prison Population Grows 27 Percent in 10 Years | Washington Free Beacon
The number of federal prison inmates has grown 27 percent in the last decade, according the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

In a report examining the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) budget, the GAO found that prison population is rising:

The Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is responsible for the custody and care of over 219,000 federal inmates—a population that has grown by 27 percent over the past decade. BOP is composed of 119 institutions, 6 regional offices, 2 staff training centers, 22 residential reentry management offices (previously called community corrections offices), and a central office in Washington, D.C. With a fiscal year 2013 operating budget of about $6.5 billion—the second-largest budget within DOJ—BOP projects that its costs will increase as the federal prison population grows through 2018. […]

A variety of factors contribute to the size of BOP’s population. These include national crime levels, law enforcement policies, and federal sentencing laws, all of which are beyond BOP’s control.
 
May 7, 2013
9,724
14,171
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#25
Money isn't the reason so many people are getting locked up.
Money is the reason though, just not the only reason. Imprisonment is a business. Have you checked the stock prices of the prison industry? Wait, what? Why is the prison industry on the stock market (but its not about money, ok /sarcasm). If the prison industry is a corporate for profit business, then who really is shaping and pushing for all the laws and sentences in this country? The simple answer is politicians and lobbyists associated with these businesses. Why have many laws and sentencing structures been in place to target specific ethnicities and communities? Because it is about money breh. What else is it about? Destruction and Imposition (the money aspect is the Materialism part of the equation). Destruction of the family unit and Imposition on it. US Slavery is still alive and well, our growth in prisoners proves that.
 
Last edited:
May 7, 2013
9,724
14,171
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#26
In short, our real issue is psychic or spiritual or however you would describe it.

We are still the richest country in the world. We should be better educated, more forward thinking. We should be ahead in science, technology, education and social and health metrics. Instead we are essentially lazy, mindless slugs.
We are not the richest country in the world. We are not ahead in any of the categories you mentioned due to systematic and educational structures. If you are not even leading a horse to the water, it doesn't even have the opportunity to drink it. It is all part of the plan though, the writing has been on the wall for decades.
 

short

Sicc OG
Feb 2, 2006
6,040
2,988
113
41
#27
we are being taken over by china as the richest country in the world. up until 1995 or whenever the clinton regime signed nafta we were. almost everything was made eher in the usa. now 90% of the shit we buy is imported. natfa and all the other trade agreements each presidential regime since clinton signed just accelerate teh destruction of the american standard of living. if nafta was voided and jobs were brought back to the usa our standadrd of living would eventually be restored

the rise in the prison incareration rate is mostly due to the drug war. as we all know the drug is just a war on weed. people are serving life without parole just for growing weed. a few people are serving life just for simple posession life for pot release non violent marijuana prisoners smh instead of life these people should have been given 6 months probation. every one of those people didnt committ any other crime other then selling or posessing weed
 

milkky

The Milk Man
Sep 6, 2010
849
856
93
29
#28
I would list my personal reasons why, in order
1. The bullshit 'war on drugs'
2. The private prison system
3. corrupt lobbyists n policy makers n our government (politicians)
4. Flawed laws .... We live in a society where you get less than 5 years for sex crimes but have mandatory minimums that are doubling, tripling, quadrupling etc sentences for non violent offenses
5. Social and economic issues.. Some communities are destroyed by the penal system.. Most don't have a chance BUT to follow in their family members footsteps, having to hustle just to survive, etc
6. Lack of drug treatment programs, drug replacement programs (think what it would be like if every drug addict had access to their DOC n a safe environment.. It would lower crimes drastically)
7. Lack of real rehabilitation in the justice systems.. Too many punitive BULLSHIT ass prisons which lead to angry, resentful inmates.. It does no purpose.. But then again, they both profit off of and WANT them to stay stuck in there jails/prisons. Recidivism=TheirBestFriend

I could keep going but there's a million and one reasons why our country's system is flawed. The #1 thing I believe thats not only caused the dramatic rise in the prison population over the last couple decades as well as the solution if we choose to fix it.. Would be changing our countries drug laws, eliminating mandatory minimums completely and re evaluating the Schedules of each drug, with increased government backing into research n studies of the drugs..to give scientists, politicians as well as regular people more accurate info.. Rather than sticking to decades old propaganda that is our official position on drugs.
 
May 7, 2013
9,724
14,171
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#29
I would list my personal reasons why, in order
1. The bullshit 'war on drugs'
2. The private prison system
3. corrupt lobbyists n policy makers n our government (politicians)
4. Flawed laws .... We live in a society where you get less than 5 years for sex crimes but have mandatory minimums that are doubling, tripling, quadrupling etc sentences for non violent offenses
5. Social and economic issues.. Some communities are destroyed by the penal system.. Most don't have a chance BUT to follow in their family members footsteps, having to hustle just to survive, etc
6. Lack of drug treatment programs, drug replacement programs (think what it would be like if every drug addict had access to their DOC n a safe environment.. It would lower crimes drastically)
7. Lack of real rehabilitation in the justice systems.. Too many punitive BULLSHIT ass prisons which lead to angry, resentful inmates.. It does no purpose.. But then again, they both profit off of and WANT them to stay stuck in there jails/prisons. Recidivism=TheirBestFriend

I could keep going but there's a million and one reasons why our country's system is flawed. The #1 thing I believe thats not only caused the dramatic rise in the prison population over the last couple decades as well as the solution if we choose to fix it.. Would be changing our countries drug laws, eliminating mandatory minimums completely and re evaluating the Schedules of each drug, with increased government backing into research n studies of the drugs..to give scientists, politicians as well as regular people more accurate info.. Rather than sticking to decades old propaganda that is our official position on drugs.
I agree with a lot of what you said here, peep game though... I just wrote a research paper titled "Harming Our Youth: The Absence of School Corporal Punishment." I understand many people are against corporal punishment, but that is not the purpose of me bringing this paper up within this discussion.

The paper outlines how harmful zero tolerance policies have become, and the effect of them being commonplace, even in the majority of the 19 states where school corporal punishment is legal, on a national level in place of non-abusive school corporal punishment. What zero tolerance policies in school have created is an increased criminality among school aged youth. In 2011-2012 school year, among over 49,000,000 public school students, more than 2,000,000 daily absences occurred (National Education Association figures). 20% of high school students grades 9-12 alone missed a minimum of one day in the school year due to threat or intimidation (CDC statistic). A big portion of those missed school days overall? Suspension, which can be directly attributed to zero tolerance policies. Zero tolerance policies also push expulsion.

There is no main governing body on suspensions and expulsions, they are left up to individual school administrators, and there are statistics that show a disproportionate use among ethnicities (but that in itself is a topic).To make things worse, zero tolerance policies in public schools mean that the school is often involving law enforcement. This is proven by the DOJ BJS arrest statistics. For instance, simple assault arrests for school aged youth not only outpaces adult simple assualt arrests by 25%, it was 115% greater in 2009 versus 1980 (ironically when the majority of states still allowed corporal punishment in schools and before zero tolerance policies were heavily pushed and mainstreamed). Drug arrests for school aged youth rose 33% during the same timeframe.

Now, instead of children having to deal with punishment at school, they are dealing with school suspension (suspension absences count against attendance) or expulsion, along with legal system punishment as well. Compound that with broken homes or the parent(s) having to work full time to support the family, while the misguided school aged youth is suspended or expelled and giving in to certain peer pressures that may further their path in criminal actions, instead of constructive achievements with that time.

What I did not cover in the research paper was who was behind the zero tolerance policies in public schools, the prison industry. The federal government generates $13k (rounded up to the nearest thousand 2012 NEA statistic) per student to educate them but it generates ~$23k/yr (rounded up to the nearest thousand 2001 DOJ BJS statistic-obviously, could be higher) to incarcerate them. The prison industry keeps an eye on our children beginning in the 3rd grade (I learned this through the American Dream Academy organization years ago but do not have the specific source on hand at this moment), in which they research national test scores to target future inmates. Long winded, I know, I will leave it at that, most of you are intelligent enough to comprehend what it is.
 
Last edited:

milkky

The Milk Man
Sep 6, 2010
849
856
93
29
#30
Wow. I'm scared for our children, and our futures. They start researching test scores at 3rd grade to evaluate and find prime targets for future incarnation.. That makes me sick inside bro.
On another note, I never personally put two and two together as far as the difference and it's effects of Suspension/ISS in school suspension.. I never quit understood why they would punish a bad kid with missing school. That's every kids dream, to get a week off of school ("legally") without any repercussions. In my eyes that not only reinforces bad behavior but promotes and encourages it.. They get rewarded, No positive lesson of any sort is taught.. And the school system gets one step closer towards expelling the student. Somewhere along the line, they forget they are there to teach students, not punish students and push them away from (any type of) learning system..
 
Last edited:
Nov 24, 2003
6,432
3,638
113
#31
I never quit understood why they would punish a bad kid with missing school.


Because schools are intended to educate children, not to raise them.

It is an interesting reflection on the state of our society as an ever increasing amount of things are considered to be the responsibility of someone else.

We are at a point where some would say that many parents are no longer capable of raising their own children and it is now the responsibility of the school system (the government) to raise their children.
 
Apr 4, 2006
1,712
329
0
39
www.myspace.com
#32
Money isn't the reason so many people are getting locked up. Americans are fat, lazy, and stupid. The poorest of our poor have it better than the middle class of many 2nd or 3rd world countries.

They blame everyone else for their problems. People want money and success the same way they can microwave a Tyson chicken dinner,and when they don't get it, they act out.

If Americans had the same fire and determination as people from poor countries, none of this would be an issue. America's problems in general fall in the same category as white people problems - unnecessary bullshitting. People would literally kill to be in our shoes. And what do we do with our great gift of prosperity?

We eat McDonald's and read about Kim Kardashian.
It's all about money, influence and contempt of authority.

I've been locked up 15-20 times on bullshit - and that bullshit just happened to be me standing up for my civil liberties.

As a libertarian I value the Bill of Rights and the Constitution and you know what? if a cop tries to violate my rights I will stand up for them and if a cop wants to arrest me then sobeit - someone has to take a stand.... I don't consider myself a martyr nor do I expect anyone to take notice - my objection is a lone objection. So I'm not doing it for the "greater good" I do what I do based on general principal.

And every time I get popped it's because I'm standing up for my rights or another individuals rights..... I don't let cops bark orders at me - when they do that I tell them to fuck off and then they charge me with "disorderly conduct" which in reality is nothing more than a "8 hour time out" and the case is promptly dropped.

IMO, the cities such as Chicago are way more brutal but at the same time if you're not carrying a large amount of cane or X or whatever they will either beat your ass if you get cocky or they will just release you..... I find that shit funny...

I guess I could list many personal experiences but I'm not going to waste your time nor mine but cops are typically tyrants (not all but most) and you know what? they can beat your ass and arrest you for any reason - you know why? because they're cops and they can get away with that bullshit...
 
Last edited:

milkky

The Milk Man
Sep 6, 2010
849
856
93
29
#33
Swoop187 ... That pretty much sums it up. Cops can do whatever, when ever, how ever the fuck they want. The sole power behind sending someone to prison (the arrest/evidence/testimony etc) or sending them home about their merry day.. So depending where your at, who you are, how you act can make or break your whole existence.. I would say the majority of the people in prison don't NEED to be there. They are victims of the "wrong place/wrong time" scenario... They pissed the wrong person off.. And I would say for every 1 person in prison, there is MINIMUM 5+ people let go/charges dropped etc in the EXACT SAME position, yet because of their skin color or previous record etc they are the unlucky Tip of the Ice Berg...i guess it boils down to cops and their ability to be the wrath of god/the devil..
 

milkky

The Milk Man
Sep 6, 2010
849
856
93
29
#34
Because schools are intended to educate children, not to raise them.

It is an interesting reflection on the state of our society as an ever increasing amount of things are considered to be the responsibility of someone else.

We are at a point where some would say that many parents are no longer capable of raising their own children and it is now the responsibility of the school system (the government) to raise their children.
I def see your point.. But isn't the point of school to be a learning experience, with a purpose to educate.. Rather than punitive? It just re I forces bad behavior and not only rewards that behavior but gives no positive alternative, and definitely pushes a "at risk youth" farther out of the school spectrum.. Which usually is the last straw, giving kids records to where they can't get into another school (expulsion is usually guaranteed)... And voila.. Another kid without even the most basic of schooling AKA high school diploma/GED... U can't even work at McDonald's nowadays without that.. So then they turn to crime, drug dealing/robbery/etc etc....
I agree. Parents and morals and responsibility of raising them correctly definitely is not a wide spread virtue as it used to be.. But basically your saying parents are giving that task to schools, who in turn are defaulting that responsibility to the penal/justice system..
 
Last edited:
May 7, 2013
9,724
14,171
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#37
In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances


The prison in Halden, Norway, shown here in April 2010, is surrounded by a 25-foot-high concrete wall and little else to suggest it's a maximum-security facility. The emphasis is on treating the prisoners with respect and giving them the skills to reintegrate into society when they leave. Heiko Junge/AFP/Getty Images

The first thing you notice when you enter the grounds of Halden Prison in Norway's far southeast is the forest: Pine and birch trees surround buildings of dark black brick with elegant windows. There's no concrete exercise yard here; it looks like a university campus.

Are Hoidal, the prison governor, smiles at the incredulous reaction of visitors. The effect of the prison design was intentional. "The only thing that looked like a prison is the big wall. You think this is a prison when you see the big wall, but the buildings [could] be a university, hospital, school, something like that," he says.


Two men sit inside the chapel at Halden prison in far southeast Norway in this picture taken in 2010. Prisoners here spend 12 hours a day in their cells, compared to many U.S. prisons where inmates spend all but one hour in their cell. STR/Reuters/Landov

A 25-foot-high concrete wall encircles the compound, but nothing else speaks of a maximum-security prison — no guard towers, no guns, no razor wire. "We have a lot of drug smugglers — it's near the border [with Sweden]. We have murderers, rapists. ... We have everything in this prison," Hoidal says.

They have done bad things, Hoidal says, but they are not bad people. "That's a really important distinction," he says. They are "human beings, we treat them with respect." And that's the philosophy behind this prison, which opened in 2010. Norway, which is rich with North Sea oil, spends $90,000 a year to house each prisoner — three times what is spent on inmates in the United States.

Norwegians think it's a good investment: The recidivism rate is less than 30 percent, half of what it is in the U.S. And there are more than 2.2 million Americans in prison; Norway's prison population is one-tenth that, on a per capita basis.

Private Rooms With Flat-Screen TVs

We walk up a meandering landscaped path, passing prisoners on the way. They greet the prison governor by his first name. The atmosphere at Halden is casual, but the doors are locked and cameras watch every movement.

Past a grove of birch trees, we approach a series of elegant wood-and-metal-clad buildings. These are the cell blocks. The 250 inmates here are locked in their cells for 12 hours a day. But those cells are private rooms, with wood furniture, a shower, a fridge and a flat-screen TV. It's not just the architecture that makes Halden unique. You'll find the staff playing badminton with inmates in the gym, eating with them in the dining areas.


Prisoners at Halden have private rooms, which all have a fridge, desk and flat-screen TV. Inmates who don't follow the rules and attend classes and counseling are sent to conventional prisons. STR/Reuters /Landov

more here
 
Last edited:
May 2, 2015
202
256
0
#38
^^ That would never work in the US. Too many illiterate lawbreakers that have a victim/follower mentality. They choose to join up with gangs and die over colors and numbers. You won't find any sort of personal responsibility for their crimes because they blame their actions on everyone and everything except their own stupid life choices.

Norway has better educated criminals that can make this type of prison work.
 
Jan 2, 2006
938
1,134
93
35
#39
its not the criminals its your country thats different
prisons in denmark norway sweden ect has been like that since before i was born
it looks modern but thats almost the only difference

this is a jailcelle in denmark see
its even got a little refrigerator and flatscreen tv lol some have playstations too


kitchen access lol smoking weed and baking cakes just having a good time (i dunno if you can see the video)Fængsel strammer kontrol efter hashkage-video - Krimi | www.bt.dk
but yea life here is just different
 
May 7, 2013
9,724
14,171
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#40
I agree with a lot of what you said here, peep game though... I just wrote a research paper titled "Harming Our Youth: The Absence of School Corporal Punishment." I understand many people are against corporal punishment, but that is not the purpose of me bringing this paper up within this discussion.

The paper outlines how harmful zero tolerance policies have become, and the effect of them being commonplace, even in the majority of the 19 states where school corporal punishment is legal, on a national level in place of non-abusive school corporal punishment. What zero tolerance policies in school have created is an increased criminality among school aged youth. In 2011-2012 school year, among over 49,000,000 public school students, more than 2,000,000 daily absences occurred (National Education Association figures). 20% of high school students grades 9-12 alone missed a minimum of one day in the school year due to threat or intimidation (CDC statistic). A big portion of those missed school days overall? Suspension, which can be directly attributed to zero tolerance policies. Zero tolerance policies also push expulsion.

There is no main governing body on suspensions and expulsions, they are left up to individual school administrators, and there are statistics that show a disproportionate use among ethnicities (but that in itself is a topic).To make things worse, zero tolerance policies in public schools mean that the school is often involving law enforcement. This is proven by the DOJ BJS arrest statistics. For instance, simple assault arrests for school aged youth not only outpaces adult simple assualt arrests by 25%, it was 115% greater in 2009 versus 1980 (ironically when the majority of states still allowed corporal punishment in schools and before zero tolerance policies were heavily pushed and mainstreamed). Drug arrests for school aged youth rose 33% during the same timeframe.

Now, instead of children having to deal with punishment at school, they are dealing with school suspension (suspension absences count against attendance) or expulsion, along with legal system punishment as well. Compound that with broken homes or the parent(s) having to work full time to support the family, while the misguided school aged youth is suspended or expelled and giving in to certain peer pressures that may further their path in criminal actions, instead of constructive achievements with that time.

What I did not cover in the research paper was who was behind the zero tolerance policies in public schools, the prison industry. The federal government generates $13k (rounded up to the nearest thousand 2012 NEA statistic) per student to educate them but it generates ~$23k/yr (rounded up to the nearest thousand 2001 DOJ BJS statistic-obviously, could be higher) to incarcerate them. The prison industry keeps an eye on our children beginning in the 3rd grade (I learned this through the American Dream Academy organization years ago but do not have the specific source on hand at this moment), in which they research national test scores to target future inmates. Long winded, I know, I will leave it at that, most of you are intelligent enough to comprehend what it is.




*pamphlet created by me for the End US Zero Tolerance Policies Project

Texas school district approves paddling to discipline students - 3TV | CBS 5