ITT Technical Institute Shutting Down All Campuses

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May 9, 2002
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#41
No idea why you take this personal and take a jab at me as if I'm the only one who is critical of ITT tech.

If you think ITT tech was perfectly legitimate and didn't have fucked up practices I don't know what to tell you since there is mountains of evidence stacked against them. You also seem to miss the biggest point about ITT tech getting all their revenue from the Government which is the biggest factor of them landing in hot water with the government. If you made $105k immediately after finishing ITT tech and you went strictly off their program and didn't have to teach yourself to be up with the times, than that's unusual and pretty amazing, you must have had amazing but vastly underpaid teachers. Good job comrade
You believe anything he says? Why?
 

noWetaG

Super Moderator
Apr 24, 2002
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#42
I have a degree from ITT and everything 2-0-Sixx @2-0-Sixx said was true.....
I graduated (with honors btw) in 2013.....
They promised me free job placement (for life);
yet I had to jump on their ass to start giving me anything after I graduated.
When they did, they sent me to jobs you could get with no education!
Never got a job and I got MYSELF a good job years after struggling;
after going into 10s of thousands of debt with them.
For tons of other reasons (i am not going to reiterate everything 2-0-Sixx @2-0-Sixx stated),
It is a scam and bullshit: I hope I can get all this debt cleared off my record
by the DOE.
 
May 7, 2013
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#43
I have a degree from ITT and everything 2-0-Sixx @2-0-Sixx said was true.....
I graduated (with honors btw) in 2013.....
They promised me free job placement (for life);
yet I had to jump on their ass to start giving me anything after I graduated.
When they did, they sent me to jobs you could get with no education!
Never got a job and I got MYSELF a good job years after struggling;
after going into 10s of thousands of debt with them.
For tons of other reasons (i am not going to reiterate everything 2-0-Sixx @2-0-Sixx stated),
It is a scam and bullshit: I hope I can get all this debt cleared off my record
by the DOE.
What program were you in? Bet it wasn't Electronics Engineering, anyway shame on them for not helping you with any good jobs, they hooked me and many others up in Phoenix with legit employment opportunities (IBM, Schlumberger, Intel, TEL, AT&T, to name a few) of course we were in the EET program when the industry experienced huge growth, can't speak for everybody, but at my current employer people were still getting hired from there up to last year and starting at $30/hr in Phoenix w/ no work related experience so opinions, assholes, you know the rest.
 
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noWetaG

Super Moderator
Apr 24, 2002
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#45
StillHustlin @StillHustlin Actually, it WAS Electronic Engineering.
I am glad you got an awesome job with it.
At the Henderson (Nevada) campus; almost all of my fellow graduates
got the same treatment and lack of tech skill curriculum.

That might be why they got shut down; but as i stated above;
the classes and education I received were not adequate to build a career,
especially considering how much I owe for it.
I have never had one electronic engineering job from this degree!
 
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noWetaG

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#47
Man, they were sending us to places like Ballys and Konami;
manufacturing and assembling slot machines.
All the people working there started with no need for an education
that put you in debt 10s of thousands of dollars.
this was like for $11 an hour.......
there were others I applied for that made at least 18-20;
but ITT didn't send me those and they never called me for an interview.
Like 2-0-Sixx @2-0-Sixx said; it's looked at like a joke.
I would love to make use of the debt i went into
I couldn't move out of state; but Vegas is nearby for a commute.
It has been 3 years since I have studied any of that,
Would you still be able to put me on something?
(I do have a good gig currently; but nothing near 100K)
 
May 7, 2013
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#50
Man, they were sending us to places like Ballys and Konami;
manufacturing and assembling slot machines.
All the people working there started with no need for an education
that put you in debt 10s of thousands of dollars.
this was like for $11 an hour.......
there were others I applied for that made at least 18-20;
but ITT didn't send me those and they never called me for an interview.
Like 2-0-Sixx @2-0-Sixx said; it's looked at like a joke.
I would love to make use of the debt i went into
I couldn't move out of state; but Vegas is nearby for a commute.
It has been 3 years since I have studied any of that,
Would you still be able to put me on something?
(I do have a good gig currently; but nothing near 100K)

Here is the thing with that. Tech wise Nevada is not really hot. I'm not trying to be disrespectful but some fields are kind of like gold mining, at least when starting out - you have to be willing to go where it's at- this is not to say there are zero opportunities, just much less depending on various factors. Do you have an A.A.S. EET or a B.S. (and what is the major?)......? Depending on what you have, with no relative work experience, also matters. Most tech companies treat associate degrees the same whether CC or Tech school. While it may be true that some employers may not weigh a B.S. from ITT the same as DeVry (yup ABET accredited) or a public University, it all depends on the specific field of the tech sector and what stage the company is in. The thing is many employers don't feel ITT provided sufficient mathematics courses comparatively to a public University (or CC+ public University), but I can tell you 100% that the tech classes I took at ITT were far superior to any I ever took at a Community College, and having already took pre-cal and all that at ITT, I aced it 16 years later when I decided to return to school years later and breezed through Calc I-III (still have Diff Eq and Linear Algebra to go, no biggie). I do have some people that may be able to lead you in the right direction in Nevada.

PM me if you are interested and we can talk specifics. I have worked in electronics for 16 years, so I am more familiar with what's possible than probably most (not saying all) people on here.

I am going to tell you flat out, if you are interested in advancing in networking or something to that effect, don't waste your time going to any more school (I previously built complex military systems for military networks), you can study for certifications on your own (books are cheap on Amazon- tax write off), go to conferences (tax write off), and build your people network through as many avenues as possible. If you want something else in the electronics field, hit me up.
 
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noWetaG

Super Moderator
Apr 24, 2002
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#52
Here is the thing with that. Tech wise Nevada is not really hot. I'm not trying to be disrespectful but some fields are kind of like gold mining, at least when starting out - you have to be willing to go where it's at- this is not to say there are zero opportunities, just much less depending on various factors. Do you have an A.A.S. EET or a B.S. (and what is the major?)......? Depending on what you have, with no relative work experience, also matters. Most tech companies treat associate degrees the same whether CC or Tech school. While it may be true that some employers may not weigh a B.S. from ITT the same as DeVry (yup ABET accredited) or a public University, it all depends on the specific field of the tech sector and what stage the company is in. The thing is many employers don't feel ITT provided sufficient mathematics courses comparatively to a public University (or CC+ public University), but I can tell you 100% that the tech classes I took at ITT were far superior to any I ever took at a Community College, and having already took pre-cal and all that at ITT, I aced it 16 years later when I decided to return to school years later and breezed through Calc I-III (still have Diff Eq and Linear Algebra to go, no biggie). I do have some people that may be able to lead you in the right direction in Nevada.

PM me if you are interested and we can talk specifics. I have worked in electronics for 16 years, so I am more familiar with what's possible than probably most (not saying all) people on here.

I am going to tell you flat out, if you are interested in advancing in networking or something to that effect, don't waste your time going to any more school (I previously built complex military systems for military networks), you can study for certifications on your own (books are cheap on Amazon- tax write off), go to conferences (tax write off), and build your people network through as many avenues as possible. If you want something else in the electronics field, hit me up.
No disrespect taken folks.
Sounds like you are just telling it like it is.
The highest Math we had to take was pre-cal.
I have the AAS
(didn't go back for the BAAS,
after that treatment, would you?).
I will be hitting you soon (PM box is full, it always is)
 

GHP

Sicc OG
Jul 21, 2002
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#53
Many colleges are ran like degree mills aimed to get you in, provide an education structure centered on a brush over to get you out of the door. I am currently enrolled in an MBA program that is on lightweight degree mill status, it was only 10 grand and my job is pretty much paying for most of it through tuition reimbursement. My bachelors in communication was more difficult and intellectually stimulating than than this MBA program, the only thing that fucks me up is the math that I'll never use in real life lol. To be honest I don't even know if I'll do anything with it since I have a job that is not too difficult that pays commission. I'll probably just use the education to frame myself as a credible individual within my field, I don't want to fuck up a sure thing.

I received my AA and BS through the GI bill so all of my student loan debt stems from a technical school for audio engineering that I attended when I got out of the military that was a complete bust minus my interest in the art. I might use my MBA skills to open a side hustle type home studio business as a tax dodge lol. I received a buttload of government student loans but I didn't touch any of the money. I'll give that shit back to them (or most of it lol) once I graduate.

My advise to the youngsters is to turn off the gangster rap and assert yourself as early as possible to try to get yourself a scholarship. My little brother earned himself a full ride to NAU because he earned good grades in high school. Speaking off personal experience it sucks to play catch up in your adult life due to making bad decisions in high school. The older you get the harder it is for the human brain to store and retain information, today's education system in this country is so fucked up cuz there are so many adults playing catch up

Do your research and find ways to go to school for as little out of pocket costs as possible such as joining the military (preferably Navy, Coast Guard, or Air Force to avoid seeing combat that can leave you psychologically disabled for the rest of your life) or talk yourself into a organization that provides tuition reimbursement programs. Otherwise you will be trapped in this generations version of indentured servitude by becoming a slave to student loan debt.
 
May 7, 2013
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#54
I think this is relevant to the education discussion, since most people further education in hopes of furthering their positions economically through working for someone else.
====================



The Peter principle is a concept in management theory formulated by Laurence J. Peter and published in 1969. The theory is that the selection of a candidate for a position is based on the candidate's performance in their current role, rather than on abilities relevant to the intended role. Thus, employees only stop being promoted once they can no longer perform effectively, and "managers rise to the level of their incompetence."

Overview

The Peter principle is a special case of a ubiquitous observation: Anything that works will be used in progressively more challenging applications until it fails. This is the "generalized Peter principle". There is much temptation to use what has worked before, even when this might not be appropriate for the current situation. Peter observed this about humans.[1]

In an organizational structure, assessing an employee's potential for a promotion is often based on their performance in the current job. This eventually results in their being promoted to their highest level of competence and potentially then to a role in which they are not competent, referred to as their "level of incompetence". The employee has no chance of further promotion, thus reaching their career's ceiling in an organization.

Peter suggests that "In time, every post tends to be occupied by an employee who is incompetent to carry out its duties"[2] and [the corollary] that "work is accomplished by those employees who have not yet reached their level of incompetence." He coined the term hierarchiology as the social science concerned with the basic principles of hierarchically organized systems in the human society.

He noted that their incompetence may be because the required skills are different, but not more difficult. For example, an excellent engineer may be a poor manager because they might not have the interpersonal skills necessary to lead a team.

Rather than seeking to promote a talented "super-competent" junior employee, Peter suggested that an incompetent manager may set them up to fail or dismiss them because they are likely to "violate the first commandment of hierarchical life with incompetent leadership: the hierarchy must be preserved".[citation needed]

Research
Alessandro Pluchino, Andrea Rapisarda, and Cesare Garofalo used an agent-based modelling approach to simulate the promotion of employees in a system where the Peter principle is assumed to be true. They found that the best way to improve efficiency in an enterprise is to promote people randomly, or to shortlist the best and the worst performer in a given group, from which the person to be promoted is then selected randomly.[3] For this work, they won the 2010 edition of the parody Ig Nobel Prize in management science.[4]

Comparable texts
José Ortega y Gasset suggested that: "All public employees should be demoted to their immediately lower level, as they have been promoted until turning incompetent".[5] Ortega died in 1955, about 14 years before Peter published The Peter Principle.

source: Wiki

 
#58
another one...

DeVry will refund $100 million to students to settle FTC lawsuit - Dec. 15, 2016

DeVry University will pay $100 million to settle a lawsuit that alleged its ads misled prospective students, the Federal Trade Commission said Thursday.

The money will go back to tens of thousands of students that attended DeVry between 2008 and 2015. Some will be reimbursed with cash and others will receive debt relief.

The complaint alleged that DeVry's TV, radio, online and print ads touted inflated job placement rates and post-grad income levels. Some ads, for example, said that 90% of grads since 1975 found jobs in their fields of study within six months of graduation. The Department of Education found that the college could not substantiate that statistic, and has prohibited the school from making that claim.

The FTC brought its lawsuit nearly one year ago and at the time, DeVry (DV) said it would fight the allegations.

On Thursday, the school said it was "pleased" the matter was resolved. It continues to deny all allegations of wrongdoing.

DeVry has about 70,000 students. The school has 55 campuses across the country, and almost all of its degree programs are also offered online. Its revenue fell 3.5% last year to $1.8 billion, mostly due to a decline in enrollment.

Related: Donald Trump pays $25 million to settle Trump University suits

A federal judge still needs to approve the settlement, but this is how the monetary awards are expected to break down:

About half of the $100 million will be distributed to students who the FTC will determine were harmed by the ads. The agency is waiting to receive more information about the students from DeVry before it can determine how many will receive compensation. If you're eligible, you will be notified by the FTC.

Related: How ITT Tech went up in smoke

The other half of the settlement money will wipe away outstanding debt for qualifying students and graduates who received a private loan from DeVry between September 2008 and September 2015 (the time period for which the ads ran). This does not apply to anyone with federal loans. Those who still owe the school money, though not necessarily through a loan, may also have their debt wiped away. If you're eligible for this kind of compensation, you will be notified by DeVry.

For more information on the refund process, visit this FTC web page.

Related: For-profit college stocks get election bump

DeVry is not the first for-profit college that has agreed to forgive students' debt in order to settle a lawsuit. Education Management Corporation, which owns the Art Institutes, agreed to forgive nearly $103 million worth of student debt last year.

Other for-profit colleges have also faced increased scrutiny under President Obama. His administration's crackdown on the industry led to the collapse of Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical Institute, both within the past two years.
 
May 7, 2013
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#59
yet they refuse to come down on the state institutions... because we all know how incredibly rich you wil become with a degree in philosophy, womens studies, journalism, Sociology, Elementary Education, Art and Architectural History, or a Masters in Puppetry...
:dead:
 
May 7, 2013
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#60
Want your student loans forgiven? Avoid these 4 mistakes - 3TV | CBS 5

By TEDDY NYKIEL
NerdWallet

Having college debt disappear is something many student loan holders can only dream of. But it's possible for some of the 44 million people in the U.S. with education loans.

Through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program, people with federal student loans can get their loans erased tax-free if they first make loan payments for 10 years while working for the government or a nonprofit.

That's the gist of it, at least. The program rules are more nuanced. Unaware of the complexities, many loan holders inadvertently make decisions that render them ineligible. Only a few hundred people are on track to get forgiveness this fall - the soonest borrowers can receive forgiveness through the program - according to data the U.S. Department of Education presented to financial aid professionals last year.

Borrowers can look out for these PSLF missteps to ensure they stay on track for loan forgiveness.

1. HAVING THE WRONG TYPE OF LOANS

Borrowers' loans must be in the Federal Direct Loan Program to qualify for PSLF, which is not the case for nearly 19 million people - or 44 percent of federal student loan borrowers - who have loans in other federal programs, according to 2017 Department of Education data. Those borrowers' nondirect loans are ineligible for PSLF unless they first join the Direct Loan Program by consolidating their debt.

And, in that case, payments won't count toward PSLF until those borrowers consolidate into direct loans.

2. MISUNDERSTANDING 'QUALIFYING PAYMENTS'

To be eligible, borrowers must work full time while making 120 qualifying monthly payments, meaning the payments were made:

After Oct. 1, 2007

Through a qualifying repayment plan (generally an income-driven plan )
For the full payment amount due
No later than 15 days after the due date
While the borrower was employed full time by a qualifying organization
To benefit from PSLF, borrowers must make at least some payments on an income-driven plan, a federal repayment plan that caps borrowers' payments at a percentage of their income. If federal loan borrowers stay on the standard 10-year plan, they'll fully repay their loans by the time they qualify for forgiveness.

Only one qualifying payment counts per month, which means paying extra each billing cycle won't help borrowers achieve forgiveness faster. The payments don't need to be consecutive. They don't count if they're made while the borrower is in school, during the loan grace period or while the loan is in deferment or forbearance.

3. WORKING FOR THE WRONG TYPE OF EMPLOYER

Federal direct loan holders who work full-time for the government, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit or an organization providing a qualifying public service may be eligible for PSLF, regardless of their job title. For instance, a full-time janitor at a public school could qualify.

"It's not about what you do," says Betsy Mayotte, director of consumer outreach and compliance for the Center for Consumer Advocacy at the Boston-based nonprofit American Student Assistance. "It's about who you work for."

Borrowers who are on the job hunt and considering PSLF should check that the employer qualifies before accepting an offer.

Until borrowers have made their 120 qualifying payments, they should submit employment certification forms to the Department of Education to confirm that their work qualifies.

4. FALLING FOR FRAUDULENT PROMISES OF FORGIVENESS

Dozens of companies use false claims to con borrowers, a NerdWallet investigation found. They promise to reduce or eliminate loans and charge high fees to enroll people in free federal programs.

For instance, "Obama student loan forgiveness" is a popular scam. The term gets more than 18,000 online searches per month, but no such program exists.

Beware of companies that collect high upfront fees or charge recurring monthly amounts, two signs that an offer is likely too good to be true.

THE FUTURE OF PUBLIC SERVICE LOAN FORGIVENESS

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has proposed cutting PSLF, which started in 2007 during the Bush administration. Critics of the program argue it's too expensive and disproportionately benefits graduate and professional school students, many of whom have six-figure debt loads.

If the proposed cuts go into effect, loans made before July 1, 2018, would be still be eligible for the program.