I jus got caught with half a pound.

  • Wanna Join? New users you can now register lightning fast using your Facebook or Twitter accounts.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Arson

Long live the KING!!!!
May 7, 2002
15,805
10,857
113
This is one of those questions, like 'where's the paperwork' that faggot-ass red dragon is embarassed to answer.
its weird how folks get nervous when you ask for it.....

for example.

The Start.....

Hey everybody say a prayer for the homie kon and moms yall. I ain't airing out business that ain't mine to divulge but on the real keep them in your thoughts, they've been through enough:(
Damn sounds serious, id hope any dude he stays solid comes out unscathed.

Holding the ladder for him!!! Lmmfwao. Naw. We all kinda like fam in here in our own sicc twisted way so ima let yall know. Our boy is on some measure 11 assualt type ish that's punishable by up to 5 years. I say pray for his moms cuz we all know what they have been thru already. FREE KON!!!!!!!!
Measure 11 Minimum Sentence 5 years 10 months.

Exceptions

In the case of Assault II(assuming best case, lowest grade of felont Assault), the judge has discretion to exempt the offender from Measure 11 mandatory sentencing if :
The offender has no prior convictions for serious offenses and
The victim did not suffer physical injury by means of a deadly weapon and
The victim did not suffer a significant physical injury.
(Weird nothing here about "pimping the system, by saying im a drug addict", Because like that would totally make some old lady who got her jaw broken over her purse feel better, "sorry where letting him go in 4 months, because he has a drug problem, which has nothing to do with a victims right to justice.)

Update, indicted on four charges next court date march 23 I believe.
4 charges off one Assault? Damn that must not be a very easy case to wipe under the rug, or one that a judge would let somebody walk because there a "drug addict", the only way drugs could be involved is if it was also a strong armed robbery, which would make "pimping" the system even more laughable of a snitches fairy tale.

Then the too simple solution to a very serious charge, sometimes things just dont make sense..

After 4 months of being locked down and going through an intense ass treatment center for my" disease" lmfao im back. I caught a case in feburary that had me facing some prison time so I pimped the system and told em I was a drug addict so I didn't have to hit the pen. But im back, on 3 years of probation and feeling good! Hope everyone is doing great......
Put threw the all Arson bs Detector and translated.

After figuring out that people in jail didnt feel sorry for me like i crave, and that prison it would probley get even worse, I decided to snitch on a couple of people in exchange for my freedom, since Im a junky like my brother, they made me go to a rehab for 4 months, where i exchanged numbers with some other patients, so we can have dick measuring contests of who has gone threw the most loss in there lives latley, but it was better then prison like ever other non snitch with my charges goes too, but I still got 3 years probation, so the system can shake me down for info everytime i slip up, hope everyone is doing great, and nobody see's thru my lies
His confident reply....

Lmfao I see your still up to your old ways fag. Actually I have paperwork on my whole case I defenitely ain't no snitch. But why am I wasting y time with u your soooo not worth it bro.
The bluff called... and Excuses predicted, and past violations brought up.

Ok, post it, ill be waiting.

I predict a "your not worth it" aka the coward credo, or a "The dog ate my paper work" , or the "i got no scanner".

And other then this new case, your allready a proven dry snitch, posting illegal dealing in the open forum, and sending everybody ive ever known AIM messages about our private business.
The predictable duck and dodge.

Don't u have anything better to do than worry about other peoples biz? I will no longer partake in your shenanigans. Have a good day
all bad

hopefully he stays solid while hes locked down and his moms can hold her own while hes up...shit sucks cuz i know homie pretty good and i know what he was goin thru wit his pops passin

i dont pray, but ill keep him in my thoughts
Guess we all have hopes and dreams, but do they always come true? or do we just "pimp" the system, and make up stories lacking any logic or possibility?
 
Mar 21, 2009
2,849
6,510
0
37
its weird how folks get nervous when you ask for it.....

for example.

The Start.....



Damn sounds serious, id hope any dude he stays solid comes out unscathed.



Measure 11 Minimum Sentence 5 years 10 months.

Exceptions

In the case of Assault II(assuming best case, lowest grade of felont Assault), the judge has discretion to exempt the offender from Measure 11 mandatory sentencing if :
The offender has no prior convictions for serious offenses and
The victim did not suffer physical injury by means of a deadly weapon and
The victim did not suffer a significant physical injury.
(Weird nothing here about "pimping the system, by saying im a drug addict", Because like that would totally make some old lady who got her jaw broken over her purse feel better, "sorry where letting him go in 4 months, because he has a drug problem, which has nothing to do with a victims right to justice.)



4 charges off one Assault? Damn that must not be a very easy case to wipe under the rug, or one that a judge would let somebody walk because there a "drug addict", the only way drugs could be involved is if it was also a strong armed robbery, which would make "pimping" the system even more laughable of a snitches fairy tale.

Then the too simple solution to a very serious charge, sometimes things just dont make sense..



Put threw the all Arson bs Detector and translated.



His confident reply....



The bluff called... and Excuses predicted, and past violations brought up.



The predictable duck and dodge.





Guess we all have hopes and dreams, but do they always come true? or do we just "pimp" the system, and make up stories lacking any logic or possibility?
i have some different calculations. are you sure that all is kosher?
 

JAPE

Sicc OG
Apr 29, 2006
7,773
168
63
32
Kon deffinately aint no snitch.. i know him personally.. first name basis. and the person that was with him. it was HIS beef. not kons.. the homie sherm stick took it.. that simple. kon said hes a drug addict. cuz first offender drug addicts are actually tried like there fuckin insane in portland.. done. give it a rest.
 

JAPE

Sicc OG
Apr 29, 2006
7,773
168
63
32
and i know sherm... its been atleast a week and nobodys warned me.. im sure sherm woulda spread the word..
 

Legman

پراید آش
Nov 5, 2002
7,487
1,962
0
34
i dunno why u used my quote but whatever

this shit is old and you guys havent handled it already...look bottom line is this...the both of you are internet characters and nothing u do on here or say, will make u seem anymore gangsta or hard or bad ass

if u got a cool personality and you come correct, your ok around these parts

so stop all this your not a gangsta bullshit, theres better things to do, like make money, or get some pussu

otherwise share addresses in a PM, pick a location and drag one poor soulless siccness goon to record it on video
 
May 5, 2006
138
28
0
38
What I don't get is this nigga just logged on to his youtube channel 19 hours ago

http://www.youtube.com/user/PRaY4U1LUV

But can't log back on the sicc, what a BITCH I just happend to find that nigga channel looking for a Jay Jonah track, ain't that some shit?
Damn...you fools made him move and relocate all the way to fuckin iceland. He got clowned that hard???
 
Aug 24, 2003
6,110
129
0
Gangs in small-town Central Washington

Grant County, with a population hovering around 89,000, hardly dominates the national radar as a center for gang activity. Yet the area logged nearly 100 robberies and shootings last year, all gang-related — including a 10-year-old boy shot in the head when his parents' trailer was riddled with bullets, and a 13-year-old girl injured in a drive-by while she sat in her living room.


TAKE A CASUAL stroll through this Central Washington farm town and you'd never guess what's going on. The streets are quiet. Men take leisurely afternoons to get their beards trimmed at the barbershop downtown. Motorists driving through, past fields of alfalfa and spearmint, are welcomed with a huge sign proclaiming Quincy the embodiment of "Opportunities Unlimited."

Yet this homespun place of 6,700 souls is also where a 25-year-old man was gunned down in broad daylight on a busy thoroughfare last spring, where cops had found a crowd of teenagers hiding a sawed-off shotgun in a couch several months earlier, and where the chief of police says a teenage girl was recently gang raped.

Nearby in Moses Lake last summer, U.S. marshals rounded up 50 suspected gang members — many of them with alleged ties to the Mexican Mafia.

Here is small-town Americana, a land of wide-open spaces, church socials and, increasingly, gang warfare.

Grant County, with a population hovering around 89,000, hardly dominates the national radar as a center for such activity. Yet the area logged nearly 100 robberies and shootings last year, all of them gang-related — including a 10-year-old boy shot in the head when his parents' trailer was riddled with bullets, and a 13-year-old girl injured in a drive-by while she sat in her living room.

"People think this is a big, safe community, but it's all under the surface," says Creeper, a 20-year-old high-school dropout from Moses Lake, and sometime member of the Marijuanos 13 set. "Believe it — we've got PL, LVL, Florencia, Marijuanos, Nortenos. You got everything out here in Moses Lake you can think of."

City officials strongly disagree, insisting that such comments are nothing more than bravado and toothless intimidation.

"That's not to say there isn't criminal activity that occurs here, but it may be overstating to call it gang crime," says Moses Lake City Manager Joseph Gavinski. "Gangs are formed for a criminal purpose. They have territory and they have organization. I'm not sure that's what we have in the city of Moses Lake."

Perhaps it's a matter of defining terms. In a 30-day period this spring, there were four shootings, two home invasions and a homicide all linked to a single Moses Lake crew, according to the Sheriff's Department, which has identified a dozen organized groups comprising more than 500 known gang members countywide. At the annual Moses Lake Spring Festival, held Memorial Day weekend, Deputy Joe Harris was stunned at the number of young people brazenly displaying their gang colors.

"For a city that doesn't have a gang problem, there sure were a lot of gang members walking around — just these packs of eight or 10 of them," he says. "It was eye-opening."

COUNTRY LIVING "is kind of an untapped resource in the gang world," says Harris, describing the changes he has seen: During the past four years, loose-knit groups of kids prone to fighting each other have evolved into true gangs, he says, with hierarchies, regular meetings and missions assigned to the youngest members — generally graffiti tagging or home burglaries.

"They're still run kind of democratically. They still have a roundtable, discuss things and vote on it," Harris says. "But now they are actively involved in selling drugs, selling guns and doing drive-bys."

Gang life has grown so active in the area that many crews meet twice a week to collect pocket change from "pee-wees," eager to contribute and help buy more ammunition before getting their next list of items to burglarize (generally stereos and guns). Each is hoping to move up the ladder, from pee-wee to street soldier, shot-caller and, finally, to becoming an esteemed O.G., or "Original Gangster."

"You see these kids," says Grinch, a Marijuanos O.G. in his 30s, gesturing at a crowd that had gathered in Quincy last winter to watch Creeper get his sixth tattoo. "They see us rap, drink. They all want in. All I have to do is ask, and they'll kill. It's that easy. Because this is not a choice for us. This is life."

Statewide, the lower Yakima Valley — Sunnyside, in particular — still outpaces Grant County as a center for gang activity. But Yakima itself has made major inroads in dealing with the problem, and its success has become Grant County's bane. Gang members have discovered that it is easy, here in the miles of emptiness, to travel at will, transporting guns and drugs and eluding law enforcement. With 2,700 square miles of open country patrolled by five sheriff's deputies, there is no round-the-clock police presence in numerous towns, including Royal City, where there are 50 known gang members, and Mattawa, where a 15-year-old was recently charged with attempted murder.

And with poverty hovering near 20 percent, there is a ready supply of bored, disaffected young people eager for a shot at real money.

IN THE SUMMER of 2009, 40 gang members were locked up in the Grant County jail, taking up half the available beds. Pleading for federal aid, local law enforcement described the area as a place where drive-by shootings occurred weekly and "bodies are dumped with little more than tattoos as identifiers."

The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has noted increased calls for help from regional law enforcement working on gang-related gun crimes. "There is a perception that this is a growing problem," says spokeswoman Cheryl Bishop.

But whatever financial support Grant County had from the federal government is about to dry up. Harris, for instance, went back to regular patrol in July, no longer funded to gather gang intelligence, even as the problem mounts.

"We have been trying to get a federal task force for years," he says. "But money is an issue. The federal agencies concentrate their efforts in urban areas because, quite frankly, the numbers out here just don't sound as sexy. In the last 30 days, we've had two gang homicides, two home invasions and six or seven shootings, all gang-related. In Seattle, they'd see that and say, 'So?' But look at it on a per capita basis."

While some groups do deal drugs or traffic weapons, the bulk of their activities — graffiti, intimidation, petty theft — have a far greater impact on more quotidian realities: "They just suck the life out of a community," says Quincy Police Chief Richard Ackerman. "Innocent people live in fear."

Not everyone in town agrees. Nor are they pleased with the chief's blunt talk. The owner of a wine bar asked aloud why news media were picking on Quincy. Curt Morris, a local real-estate agent, acknowledged the gunplay, but characterized it as little more than an annoyance. "We're sick of it," he says. "It's a headache. But am I afraid to walk around at night? No."

Indeed, most people passing through these parts would feel the same. Ackerman has been assiduous in painting out graffiti, and the streets feel safe.

But not to Creeper, afraid to go shopping almost anywhere in the county for fear of running into a rival gang member. He says he is done with that life now, focused on getting a job and putting the past behind. Still, he cannot quite disavow the group that provided him with a sense of family back when he was a shy, chubby kid overwhelmed by middle school.

"When you're young, you run with the pee-wees, trying to earn your name, your stripes," he says. "When I got into this, I knew what I was in. But people are only hearing the bad side. We do things just like any family. We have barbecues. We go jet-skiing. Even the newspaper says our gang's more organized, more structured. We keep our people in line, in check. We got our code of conduct that we don't break."

Primarily, this code mandates that criminal activity remains within the gang.

"You don't bring it to your families. You don't bring it to your house. Stuff happens, but gangs are going to regulate whoever messed up," Creeper explains. "Innocent people are innocent. You don't go after them — kids and women, especially. Innocents are innocent."

Cops, of course, do not enjoy that distinction. Two summers ago, members of one gang routinely cruised a quiet development in Moses Lake where several state patrolmen lived, taunting the officers by driving slowly past their homes, music blaring, and tossing beer bottles onto the manicured lawns.

This trend is what most upsets Harris. "That was one of those lines you just did not cross, but they're doing it now," he says. "Before, there was that mutual respect: I jack you. I don't go out and jack up your family, so you don't come to my house, either."

No more. Four alleged gang members recently attacked two officers leaving a Mattawa High School football game, Harris says.

Frightened into trying to make a fresh start after a gang fight left the floor of his home covered in blood, Creeper moved in with his parents several months ago. But erasing the past has not been easy. Creeper is a ninth-grade dropout, covered in tattoos, and his prospects for legitimate employment are limited, while the likelihood of crossing paths with a gang member is not.

"It's all over Moses Lake," says his mother. "When he moved in here, he didn't let any of them know where he was. But this is a small town — everybody knows everybody. When my son went to our neighbor's house, there were kids from four gangs there, and they wanted to fight. It was very, very uncomfortable for him."

If Creeper's gang activity has left him scared and confused, it has taken an even greater toll on his family. Over the past decade, his mother and father have had to secure their home against theft from within and defend their younger son from assault by Creeper's associates (at one point taking out a restraining order). The more they fought, the deeper Creeper's involvement grew.

"We've felt completely alone in this," his mother says. "There doesn't seem to be any information on what to do to stop it, like the only answer is to leave. The gangs just came after and after him, starting in grade school. By middle school it was over."

Even now, though she believes the worst is behind them, the family home remains in turmoil, and Creeper has once again moved out. "Everything just feels like it's crumbling," Creeper's mother says. "My husband is constantly running — still — to bring our son food or help with his bills. I don't know if he'll ever get a job. We made mistakes. I think we should have installed alarms on the windows so he couldn't sneak out. But you can't exactly lock them up in a closet till they're 35."

LAW-ABIDING folks around here are finally holding meetings and saying it out loud, if cautiously: Gangs are making their lives increasingly uncomfortable. While most of the crime is focused on other initiates, brazen assaults such as the assassination of a 16-year-old last year in Beverly — a town of 620 people — and the dumping of a 17-year-old's body by the side of the road in Desert Aire, do nothing to help real-estate agents, tourism boosters or city officials trying to position their region as a family-friendly resort area.

"It's a huge problem," says a business owner in downtown Quincy, who grew concerned enough to apply for a concealed-weapons permit and now carries a gun to work. "In the past six months we've had two murders, and there's gun shots every week. In a city like Seattle, maybe that's easier to deal with, but we're a small community. Our quality of life has been diminished because of this."

Property values could be affected as well, he says. "I can't pretend that me and my family haven't talked about leaving town. We have. But we're in the middle of an economic crisis. My home isn't worth as much as it used to be, so I can't sell right now. I feel trapped."

Harris, too, knows people who have moved away or canceled plans to retire in Grant County because of gang crime. Yet his frustration is tinged with a grudging respect for the ingenuity and drive of his opponents. One gang member bragged to him about his crew's use of police scanners: "You guys are going to have a hell of a time catching us because we know what you're going to do before you do it," he'd said. And the officer could not argue.

Even Chief Ackerman, who moved to Quincy in 2009, was surprised at the reality. A veteran cop who retired after 32 years with the Los Angeles Police Department, Ackerman had done what research he could before arriving in town for his job interview and found not a word about gangs. But driving around, their presence was unmistakable.

"Any law-enforcement officer with experience is going to see all the tagging and say, 'Oh, I'm in a gang area.' It's as obvious as the nose on your face," he says.

"If we don't do something to manage this right away, we're headed in the same direction as Yakima Valley — whether folks here want to admit it or not."

Claudia Rowe is a Seattle freelance writer. Mike Kane is a Seattle freelance photographer.
 
Aug 24, 2003
6,110
129
0
lulz


ON THE COVER Savage, a prospective member of the Marijuanos gang, drives around Moses Lake with other gang members this past spring. After a long courtship with the gang, Savage was set to be jumped in and made an official gang member, but in May he was arrested and jailed, preventing his initiation.



Chivo, a Sureño, moved to Grant County from Los Angeles when he was 8. Soon after arriving, Chivo and three of his gang-affiliated uncles attacked a group of rival gang members, a memory Chivo wishes he could forget.




Grinch, the 29-year-old leader of the Marijuanos -- one of the hundreds of Sureño gangs that pay tribute to the Mexican Mafia, pretends to shoot a pistol while rapping during a party in Quincy. Like many members of the Marijuanos, Grinch is a devoted rapper with visions of success in the music industry.




Creeper, who has been a member of the Marijuanos gang, hangs out with friends at a secret spot in Moses Lake where they say they often smoke marijuana. Gang nicknames instead of real names are being used in this story to protect the families and friends of these young men.




Chubs and Chivo shadow box in a parking lot in Quincy. Though not yet a full member of the Marijuanos gang, Chubs was recently attacked by a group of enemy gang members.




Malo tattoos a fellow gang member at a party in Quincy in December 2009. Malo was recently incarcerated on felony weapons charges.



Gang members affiliated with the Marijuanos walk behind houses where they spray-painted graffiti in May, 2010. While much of the gang activity in these small Grant County towns isn't so obvious, locals are becoming increasingly concerned about it.




Young men affiliated with local gangs cruise around Moses Lake, mostly unconcerned about getting in trouble with the law. In a 30-day period this spring, four shootings, two home invasions and a homicide were all linked to a single Moses Lake crew, according to the Sheriff's Department, which has identified more than 500 gang members countywide.




Last fall, Creeper was hanging out in a house used by several gang-affiliated young adults in Moses Lake. These days, he says he is done with that life, but he still worries about running into rival gang members.




The backyard of a house used by several gang-affiliated young adults in Moses Lake.





In early 2010, Creeper bonded with the daughter of his girlfriend at the time.




Creeper smokes a cigarette while looking out from a tree fort in the backyard of a childhood friend's house in Moses Lake in December 2009. Creeper's parents have repeatedly kicked him out of their home because of his gang involvement, and he has been staying wherever he can.




A gang leaves its tag on a farm building in Grant County in September 2009. The wide-open spaces and small police forces are attracting the gangs, who feel free to operate without much risk of tangling with the law.




Creeper's girlfriend, Sarah, watches a young girl enter Creeper's bedroom in a house shared by multiple gang members in Moses Lake. The girl's mother has been staying on a couch in the house, and the girl has been exposed to late parties and drug use, along with drug dealing, fights and other gang-related activities.




Prospective gang members hang out in one of many Moses Lake houses that had been all but abandoned by any parental figure in December 2009. Poverty and the lack of either parental guidance or police-based gang intervention are big factors in gang involvement.




Spooky, a member of the Marijuanos, smokes outside a friend's family's apartment in Moses Lake. Spooky has been essentially homeless since he was a child and stayed with the families of friends until he became gang-involved.
 
Feb 11, 2006
10,369
25,573
113
42
Homie i'm 28 years old i don't need 2 slang it up whicha..but since yr sooo cool how bout Dank,Dro,Bomb,Bud,PugetPower,fire,fy,kill,...homie u couldnt even smoke with me i'd peel yr pea.

U must be a poor black ghetto trashy piece a shit who jacks his homies n stabs bitches up theyre purse hustlin 50 rocks all day cuz ya cant get yr paper up enough 2 even cop a bucket..

There aint no snitch in my bones n never tell a soul. besides homie its jus a lil weed...where u at? ARIZONA,NEVADA,Texas...?

You aint seen a stamp in yr life tiny tim let alone any packs so please GTFOH!

And no i dont have insurance n havnt 4 years. And Yes I owned a buisness the whole time..it really aint that hard 2 believe gangsta.
[email protected] the whole sentence
special mention to the use of the word pugetpower
 
Status
Not open for further replies.