Twitter IPO / Who Buyin?

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Dec 4, 2006
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#26
which site you guys use for trading?

I been wanting to do this for years and never got around to it..

all I know is I'm missing out ..
 

S.SAVAGE

SICCNESS MOTHERFUCKER
Oct 25, 2011
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EAST SAN JOSE
#29
What's the starting amount? $500? $1000?
nah breh you could buy 1 share in 1 company even if it is .40 cents. & start from there

play with what you have to play with

think of it as a gamble, not an investment & your more likely to stay on your toes, unless you got hella money to throw around.
 
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May 7, 2013
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33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#32
11/18: Shares of Twitter (TWTR) declined 6.5%. Analysts at Wunderlich Securities on Monday initiated coverage of Twitter with a selling rating and a price target of $34, describing it as a great company with an overvalued stock.

"While the company has an impressive revenue growth opportunity over the next several years, it is currently in heavy investment mode," Blake Harper, an analyst at Wunderlich, said in a report. He expects the company to be in the red into fiscal 2015.

Twitter was also one of the stocks, along with LinkedIn Corp. (LNKD) and Workday Inc. (WDAY), identified by Barron's as being overvalued in a report published over the weekend. Concerns about Twitter's valuation have escalated in the wake of the microblogging company's strong debut on the market on Nov. 7.

----
Twitter Inc
NYSE: TWTR - Nov 20 11:26 AM ET
40.78-0.97 (-2.32%)

I'm watching for that $34 target myself
 
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Props: fuckery

emma

Sicc OG
Apr 5, 2006
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#33
I'm kind of risk averse, so I don't speculate w/ individual stocks. Mutual funds are great for me though.

So far I'm just saving for retirement; ideally I would be able to max out all tax advantaged accounts (401k, IRA) before investing in taxable accounts.

For anybody who wants to learn about investing, I've found Bogleheads to be an extremely helpful place to start: Bogleheads
 
Jan 23, 2006
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#34
everyday is a new all time high for the market in general these days. shit is nuts.

gonna be interesting to see what happens when interest rates really go up which has to happen at some point. this shit is too artificial low. will it force stocks up further? does the market shit the bed all together?

cant imagine wanting to buy any intermediate to long duration bond funds for the next few years, eh?

crazy times.

go aggressive, and buy all stocks = major risk
go conservative and get bonds = losing money with rising interest rates and prolly will for the next bunch of years
be a pussy and get cd's or mmkts = having inflation grow like a mafucka while you get less than a percent.

interesting times.
 

emma

Sicc OG
Apr 5, 2006
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#35
go aggressive, and buy all stocks = major risk
go conservative and get bonds = losing money with rising interest rates and prolly will for the next bunch of years
be a pussy and get cd's or mmkts = having inflation grow like a mafucka while you get less than a percent.
That's why you should diversify your investments.
 
Props: NAMO
May 6, 2002
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#37
u trade options a lot?
I always have an option going. I usually just play with dividend that come in. sometimes I buyback more stock, somethings I play options. Just depends on what's out there. I bet on WMT to show poor earnings, which they did, but the stock price didn't even budge. So, I lost. Not much though.

So far it's been a great year, because I was heavily invested in the S&P. My biggest lag is INTC. Still holding...
 

emma

Sicc OG
Apr 5, 2006
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#38
why include cash?

why get longer duration bonds?

historically, i'd agree. not in this instance.
It's good to keep a few months worth of cash liquid in an emergency fund/savings account in case something unexpected happens, like you have an expensive car repair, you lose your job, or something like that. If you had a big emergency expense in 2008/2009 and all of your money was in stocks, you would have been in bad shape...

As for bonds, I have a small percentage of my retirement accounts in bond mutual funds. If the stock market were to crash, I could use some of that money to rebalance & buy more stock funds while they're low.

If you're young & investing for the long term, I don't really think having more than 20% in bonds makes much sense... but I do think it's important not to put all your eggs in one basket, as they say.
 
May 7, 2013
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www.hoescantstopme.biz
#39
I'm happy with my diversification, I currently put away 20% annually toward retirement in various forms, 25% will be my annual ceiling which will be reached in 4 years unless we have a financial collapse. Its important to be liquid as well and to have back up currency such as physical precious metals, and tangible goods. Potentially government can raid your retirement funds and even bank accounts. They could increase taxation on capital gains. Of course govt can take your precious metals too (US did gold confiscation before) if they can find it.
 
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May 6, 2002
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#40
Everyone invests differently. You can't really tell one person how to invest because everyone's situation is different. I'm purely holding stock shares. I've been like that for a long time. I started out with mutual funds when I was a kid but you slowly start to see how to play the game properly. I manage my Mom's portfolio and I have her in all mutual funds, buying shares of WFC with dividends. Play it super safe for her.

For me, I'll always be all stocks and some options.
I know people who look at me like I'm a fraidy cat because they play ALL options and think anyone who holds any stock is crazy. They don't want to own anything. Just buy and sell contracts.

So it's really all about comfort level...
 
Props: StillHustlin