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Jul 24, 2005
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Abraham vs. Dirrell: Arthur won’t hit what he can’t see

By Scott Gilfoid: Former IBF middleweight champion Arthur Abraham (31-0, 25 KO’s) might as well re-park his red Ferrari back in his garage and leave it there for the rest of the Super Six tournament after he gets pummeled by American Andre Dirrell (18-1, 13 KO’s) next month on March 6th in their stage 2 Super Six bout. Abraham, 29, had his brief bit of glory by beating Jermain Taylor by a 12th round knockout in his first stage 1 bout in the Super Six tournament in October, but that’s all about to change in Abraham’s next fight against the talented Dirrell.


Abraham is going to take royal beating that will make his head spin, and I almost feel sorry for him. I say almost because boxing is a tough business and losing is part of the territory. Abraham has had his share of success winning his first 31 fights of his seven year pro career.

Although in fairness to Edison Miranda, I think he should have been given the decision against Abraham in their first fight in September 2006, in a fight that took place in Abraham’s adopted country of Germany. That was the worse decision I’ve seen in my life, aside from the Carl Froch 12 round split decision win over Dirrell last October. But never the less, Abraham’s luck is about to run out next month against Dirrell.

Of the fighters that are taking part in the Super Six tournament, Dirrell has arguably the best talent and size of any of the fighters present. At 6′2″, Dirrell, as I’ve said previously, has the speed and boxing ability of a young Sugar Ray Robinson, Cassius Clay and Roy Jones Jr. lumped into one. The only thing that’s missing with Dirrell is a slight adjustment that he needs to make on his punch output. Beyond that, he’s basically an unbeatable fighter.

With Dirrell’s talent, I can see him humiliating Abraham and then sweeping through the remainder of the Super Six tournament and winning it with relative ease. I hope that Froch will meet Dirrell again, so that Dirrell can school him in the worst way. However, I have my doubts that Froch will get by his next two opponents Mikkel Kessler and Abraham.

My guess is Froch will lose both, and get drummed out of the tournament. Dirrell can always fight Froch at some point in the future and even the score, although I would much prefer that the fight not take place in Nottingham again for obvious reason. Dirrell doesn’t need to be fighting Froch along with 8000 screaming fans. I see it being Dirrell’s choice where the fight takes place after winning the Super Six tournament. After all, Dirrell will have the WBA and WBC super middleweight titles after winning the tournament and all roads will lead to him.

As far as Abraham goes, he’s too slow to do much against Dirrell. This isn’t even going to be sporting. Abraham will be hitting air all night long in his clumsy attacks and picked apart by Dirrell round after round
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Bute vs. Dawson: Who would win?

By William Mackay: Although International Boxing Federation (IBF) super middleweight champion Lucian Bute (25-0, 20 KO’s) and WBC light heavyweight champion Chad Dawson (29-0, 17 KO’s) are separated by one division, you have to wonder what would be the out if they fought now or in the near future. With only a mere seven pounds separating the two fighters, it wouldn’t be a case where either of them could make excuses for not fighting each other. For some boxing fans, they see the 29-year-old Bute as the best fighter in the super middleweight division, and in the same turn, perhaps an overwhelming about of fans see the 27-year-old Dawson as the best fighter in the light heavyweight division.


Bute, however, still hasn’t actually proved that he’s the best fighter in the super middleweight division. For him to do that, Bute will have to fight the winner of the Super Six tournament contests Andre Dirrell, Andre Ward, Mikkel Kessler, Carl Froch, Allan Green and Arthur Abraham. It’s difficult to tell who will ultimately win that tournament, but based on how the different fighters have looked thus far, it could be Ward, Froch or Abraham.

One would hope that Bute’s handlers do the right thing and try to position him for a unification bout against the winner of the Super Six tournament. But beyond that, a fight against Dawson would seem to be just as good, if not better for Bute. Dawson, 6’1”, is an inch shorter than the 6’2” Bute, However, Dawson has a long 6 ½” reach advantage over Bute, and with his much faster hands than the Romanian Bute, Dawson would have another big plus working for him in a fight against Bute.

This wouldn’t be a fight in which Bute could use his hit and run style of fighting to get in and get away from the much quicker Dawson, because Chad, being so fast with his hands, would time Bute each time the Canadian based super middleweight came at him. I think it’s fair to say that Dawson would totally bottle up Bute’s hit and run style of fighting, and would force him to try a different tactic if he wanted to win.

Dawson had some problems with Antonio Tarver in his 2nd fight with him when Tarver decided to employ a high punch volume attack against Dawson. You could see that Dawson wasn’t comfortable with Tarver’s aggressiveness, yet even with Dawson looking a little flustered at times; he still was able to dominate Tarver and win comfortably by the scores of 117-111, 117-111 and 116-112.

Bute would have to change his style completely to throw more punches, and I’m not sure that he could do what Tarver did because Tarver’s reach was almost identical with Dawson. Bute will be giving up a half a foot in reach to Dawson, and besides that, Bute hasn’t shown in his other fights that he’s capable of being anything more than a hit and run type fighter.

That kind of style just won’t work against the much quicker Dawson. Chad is more of fighter that cautiously stays on the outside, and fires off blazing fast combinations whenever he wants to. His southpaw stance makes Dawson even tougher to deal with. Bute, likewise, is a southpaw, but in this case Dawson would totally neutralize what is normally a big advantage for Bute.

I think with all the things going for Dawson in a fight like this, I think it’s safe to say that Dawson would totally dominate Bute and win by a comfortable 12 round decision. I think it would be a great fight and one good for boxing. I hope a match between the two fighters can be made soon before Bute gets much older.

At 29, he’s likely to start showing his age pretty soon and it would be sad to have that be an excuse for him being dominated by Dawson in a future fight. I see Dawson easily beating Bute no matter what age of the two fighters. Dawson just seems to have far too many physical tools compared to the slower Bute.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Scoreboard: Mayweather 1, Pacquiao 0

by Geoffrey Ciani - When negotiations for a proposed mega bout between Floyd Mayweather Junior and Manny Pacquiao fell apart, the boxing world was outraged and not without good reason. After all, this could have been the biggest fight in boxing history. That Mayweather and Pacquiao were unable to reach an agreement is inexcusable—especially when one considers they had already come to terms on the purse split. If the fight had fallen apart over money issues it would almost be understandable, but instead, negotiations collapsed because of Mayweather’s unprecedented request for Olympic style drug testing.

As a result, three general schools of thought have emerged. The first group consists of people who blame Mayweather. Since Mayweather asked Pacquiao to go beyond what the rules and regulations require, he was being unreasonable with his demands.. People from this school of thought tend to believe Mayweather was afraid of Pacquiao and that he requested this stipulation knowing full well it would be rejected which enabled him to weasel his way out of the fight. The second group blames Pacquiao. If Pacquiao was clean, then he should have taken the tests in order to bring fans the fight they craved and deserved. They believe Pacquiao was either reluctant to face Floyd or that he had something to hide. The third group blames both fighters equally. Regardless of who was at fault, a compromise should have been reached—one way or another.

When the dust from this fiasco had finally settled, the battle was over. The war, however, was just beginning. Following the opening stalemate, despite being disappointed, fans were eager to know what was next for the world’s two best fighters. Since Pacquiao and Mayweather were not squaring off, each was destined to be defined by his following fight. We soon learned that Joshua Clottey would be next for Manny Pacquiao. Clottey represents yet another dangerous test for Pacquiao. He is a solid fighter, and many observers believe he deserved the nod in his fight against Miguel Cotto. To quote legendary trainer Emanuel Stweard, “Clottey is a fighter I would not want any fighter to fight. He would have been a rough fight for Sugar Ray Leonard, for Tommy Hearns, and for any other welterweights in history.”

On the other hand, Mayweather was left with few available options. If he did not take on a big challenge, his reputation was slated to take a huge hit. After all, following their failed negotiations, Pacquiao immediately jumped into a tough fight with Clottey. Mayweather needed a big fight to save face and keep pace. When rumors surfaced about the possibility of Mayweather squaring off against the unheralded Matthew Hatton, scorn and ridicule soon followed. Fortunately for Mayweather, an unfortunate event helped pave the way for a new opportunity. Following the catastrophic earthquake in Haiti, a scheduled unification bout between Shane Mosley and Andre Berto was cancelled. In a statement to the press, Berto (who represented Haiti in the 2004 Olympic Games) stated he was “physically and emotionally unable to prepare”—and understandably so.

The tragedy in Haiti opened the door for a Mosley-Mayweather showdown. This is a fight Mosley was eager to make happen. He immediately agreed to the Olympic style drug testing that Pacquiao refused, and the two quickly came to terms financially. Even still, Mayweather was reluctant to sign—but in reality, he had little choice in the matter. A fight against Mosley simply had too much upside for Mayweather to refuse. For starters, it would allow him to get one up on Pacquiao. Although Pacquiao is facing a tough challenge in Clottey, Sugar Shane Mosley is a bigger name and a better fighter. In addition, taking a fight with Mosley would help silence critics who accused Floyd of never having faced a legitimate top welterweight and it would also put an end to criticisms that he has been ducking Mosley in particular. Furthermore, Mosley is also widely regarded as the true welterweight champion so a victory would further solidify Floyd’s claims to greatness. Mayweather’s reputation had everything to lose in refusing this fight and everything to gain should he take it and win.

Mayweather ultimately did the right thing and signed to fight Mosley. This makes Floyd the winner of his second battle outside the ring with Pacquiao because there can be no doubt that Floyd is facing the tougher challenge. Mayweather deserves credit for taking this fight, even if it means he will ultimately suffer his first professional loss. Make no mistake—Sugar Shane Mosley is going to beat Floyd Mayweather. Remember, this is not a fight Mayweather actually wanted. Rather, it was a fight that was forced on him by circumstance. Mayweather is probably regretting the fact that he ever played hard ball with Pacquiao in the first place, because Pacquiao was at least a winnable fight for Floyd. At the end of the day, Mosley is going to show the whole world why Mayweather was always so reluctant to test himself against the best welterweights. Not only is Mosley going to win against Mayweather, but he is going to do so with surprising ease. This, however, is the subject for a future article.

The good news is if Pacquiao beats Clottey as expected, a clash between Mosley and Pacquiao seems inevitable sometime later this year.
 
May 13, 2002
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Seattle
www.socialistworld.net
Awesome doubleheader...


Berto-Quintana, Cloud-Johnson Double For April 10, HBO


By Rick Reeno

BoxingScene.com has been advised that a very interesting doubleheader is being put together for April 10 on HBO. In the main event, undefeated WBC welterweight champion Andre Berto would defend his title against former champion Carlos Quintana. The deal for Berto-Quintana is nearly complete. Quintana is a very dangerous opponent for Berto.

In the co-feature, unbeaten IBF light heavyweight champion Tavoris Cloud would defend his title against mandatory challenger Glen Johnson. This fight should answer a lot of questions about Cloud's potential.

Considering Berto and Johnson are both from Florida, you can easily guess where the event is likely going to land.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Pavlik vs. Martinez: Kelly could face Super Six tournament winner next year

y Chris Williams: WBC/WBO middleweight champion Kelly Pavlik (36-1, 32 KO’s) faces easily his best opponent since winning his middleweight titles three years ago when he steps in the ring against junior middleweight Sergio Martinez (44-2-2, 24 KO’s) on April 17th at the Boardwalk Hall, in Atlantic City, New Jersey. This fight has a lot riding on for the 27-year-old Pavlik, because if he wins, he could find himself in bouts against WBA middleweight champion Felix Sturm later on in 2010, a possible fight against old war horse Winky Wright or fight against International Boxing Federation super middleweight champion Lucian Bute.

And if that’s not enough, there’s talk of Pavlik also fighting the winner of the Super Six tournament next year. That’s a lot of things to have on Pavlik’s plate, and as excruciatingly awful as Pavlik looked in losing a 12 round decision fight against 44-year-old Bernard Hopkins in October 2008, you have to really think positive to see Pavlik winning any of those fighters other than the bout against the non-offensively inclined Sturm.

Bute, Wright, and the Super Six winner will likely all be a step too far for slugger Pavlik. But first things first, Pavlik has to get by the 5’11” Martinez on April 17th. This may not be an easy task for Pavlik, because even though he’ll have a three inch height advantage over Martinez, he’ll actually be giving up an inch in reach to the Argentinean fighter.

As we saw in Martinez’s recent fight against Paul Williams, size means nothing for Martinez. His hand speed and movement is so extraordinary that it doesn’t matter if he’ll be giving up a little in the size department to the straight-up fighting Pavlik. The real question for this fight is whether Pavlik’s huge power will be enough of a problem for Martinez that Kelly is somehow able to pull out a decision.

Pavlik doesn’t have a nonstop high pressure style of fighting that Martinez had problems with in his 7th round stoppage loss to a young Antonio Margarito 10 years ago in 2010. Pavlik is rather slow and methodical, and tends to plod around the ring in straight lines. Pavlik doesn’t handle lateral movement well, as we witnessed in his lopsided 12 round decision loss to Hopkins in 2008.

Martinez is a much better mover than Hopkins, so Pavlik really has his work cut out for him in the Martinez fight. Martinez did have problems in his 12 round draw against big punching Kermit Cintron last year in February, but then again, Cintron showed some halfway decent boxing ability in that fight. But even though Cintron fought well at times and was able to get a draw, he appeared to get knocked out by Martinez after getting dropped by a left hand in the fight.

The referee blew the call and gave Cintron the benefit of the doubt after Cintron complained that the knockdown occurred from a head clash and not a punch. Martinez also lost a point by clinching in the final round, even though he hadn’t received any prior warnings for this.

If Pavlik can get by Martinez, then we could be seeing Pavlik go after Sturm next. Pavlik won’t be facing Paul Williams, unfortunately, because Williams wants a 50-50 of the revenues for a fight against Pavlik, and that’s not something that Pavlik’s promoter Bob Arum of Top Rank is going to agree to. The Sturm will be interesting if Pavlik’s management can line it up. But it’s hard to get excited about a Pavlik vs. Winky Wright fight because of Wright’s advanced age.

Winky is 38, and by the time that he and Pavlik fight, he could be 39. I’ve already see Pavlik get dominated by a fighter over 40, but I don’t think I want to see him take on another old guy and get humiliated again. If I want to see Pavlik get embarrassed, I’d rather see him fight a super middleweight like Bute, Andre Ward, Carl Froch, Mikkel Kessler or Andre Dirrell, all super Six tournament fighters.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Froch: “It’s pressure and I thrive on the stuff, as you know”

By Scott Gilfoid: WBC super middleweight champion Carl Froch (26-0, 20 KO’s) sounded his usually confident self in a recent press conference with his April 24th opponent former World Boxing Association super middleweight champion Mikkel Kessler. Froch, talking about his upcoming fight against Kessler, said “It’s pressure and I thrive on the stuff, as you know,” according to Sky Sports. “I went into the lion’s den in Connecticut to fight Jermain Taylor in the middle of a big forest.” Oh brother. Froch is really making a big deal of traveling to the United States for his fight against the fading Taylor last year, but come on, Connecticut isn’t anywhere close to Arkansas, which is where Taylor comes from.

This wasn’t a fight that was attended by a huge horde of Taylor fans, because the fight was way out in the boondocks of Connecticut rather than anywhere close to Taylor’s home town of Little Rock, Arkansas. I’m not sure if Froch is aware how far away Arkansas is from Connecticut, but if he might be a little surprised at how far away it is if he was to look at a map. Arkansas is next to Texas, which is almost the midpoint of the U.S. Connecticut is all the way on the East Coast, miles and miles away.

I’m sure some of Taylor’s fans made the trip all the way to Connecticut to see him fight Froch, but probably not as many as Froch might think. My guess is this fight was filled with local people who were around the area at the Foxwoods resort. Taylor’s a fairly popular fighter, but he doesn’t have a huge fan base in the U.S. like Froch does in the UK.

Froch continues about his travels to fight Taylor in Connecticut, “It was difficult. There were 5000 fans booing me and about five fans cheering me, but when you are in that ring, it’s just you and your opponent and the referee. That’s it.”

Gosh, Froch is starting to sound really corny and melodramatic. Out of curiosity, I pulled out my DVD of the Froch-Taylor fight, and sure enough just as I remembered it, the fans at the fight were as quiet as a bunch of scared mice. This was hardly a hostile crowd that Froch was experiencing. All I can say is Froch might be confusing this fight with one of his others during his career, because the U.S. fans weren’t cheering or booing.

Sometimes there was some sporadic cheering, for example, when Taylor dropped Froch in the 3rd round with a right hand, but other than that, it was deathly quiet. Also, Froch was cheered when he dropped Taylor in the 12th round and then finished him off. Somehow, I seriously doubt that Taylor would be cheered if he ventured into Nottingham and took Froch out in a similar fashion.

Froch says “So the ring can be wherever, the result is going to be the same. I’m defending this title in the lion’s den [Herning, Denmark] and defending it in style, regardless of where it is.” Ok, we get your point, Froch.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Will Haye avoid fighting Vitali Klitschko until he retires?

By William Mackay: Recently, World Boxing Council heavyweight champion Vitali Klitschko (39-2, 37 KO’s) said that he would retire at the end of 2010, after [hopefully] fighting WBA heavyweight champion David Haye (23-1, 21 KO’s). But I’m wondering whether the 29-year-old Haye will ever choose to fight Klitschko? Haye already had a chance to fight both Klitschko brothers and in both cases, Haye either came in lame at the starting line or pulled away because he was unhappy with the contract terms.

Given that coming events cast their shadows before, we could see Haye continue to look in a different direction rather than risk his impressive looking record by getting in the ring against the 38-year-old Klitschko.

To be sure, you couldn’t blame Haye if he did sidestep around Klitschko and opt to fight some of the rather mediocre fighters in the top 15 in the WBA. As bad as some of these fighters are, Haye, in theory, could hold onto his title for many years to come and get out of the sport without suffering another loss.

But if Haye faces the older Klitschko brother, who would have a big four inch height advantage over the 6’3” Haye, then there’s an excellent chance that Haye would not only get beaten, but also knocked out in the process. So I couldn’t really blame Haye if he decides to wait Klitschko out until he retires, especially when many other top fighters in the lower weight classes are picking and choosing beatable opponents rather than taking risky fights.

Why should Haye be any different than the typical cherry pickers? Vital is quite vulnerable because of his advanced age. Even if he wants to stick around, he’s at an age now where we will surely start seeing an even more dramatic decrease in his hand speed than we saw in his last fight against unbeaten heavyweight contender Kevin Johnson in December. Klitschko looked as if he had lost some of his hand speed from his last fight only three months earlier in September.

But more importantly, Klitschko, with his history of injuries, could sustain a career-ending injury at any time now because of his age, and that would be the end of any hopes of a fight against Haye. As such, Klitschko can’t afford to wait beyond 2010 if he wants a competitive fight against Haye, and this puts the British fighter in a position of power.

Haye can easily go in another direction, saying that the contract terms weren’t to his liking and Klitschko would have little choice but to retire unless he wants to stick around and fight no-name heavyweights for another year or two, hoping that Haye will change his mind. But I have feeling that Haye never will. He can really milk his title for long time if he avoids fighting either of the Klitschko brothers.

The heavyweight division being as talent poor as it is, a fighter like Haye can really dominate the division as long as he stays away from the Klitschko brothers. They’re obviously too big for Haye to match up well against, and it would be almost a certain loss if he were to decide on fighting one or both of them.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Kessler: “I have a surprise for Froch”

Nottingham (18.02.2010) – WBC Super-Middleweight Champion Carl Froch does not care whether the old or the new Mikkel Kessler will show up on April 24 – he plans to knock out either one. Thats what “The Cobra” told a crowded press conference in the Robin Hood Suite at Nottingham Forests football stadium on Wednesday afternoon. “They say styles make fights and our fight will be an exciting one,” he stated. “I am curious to see whether it will be the old or the new Kessler in the ring. It does not matter to me, I am planning to knock him out anyway.”

The Viking Warrior was quick to respond: “Well, Carl, you dont know the new Mikkel Kessler yet. You will be in for a very explosive surprise when we meet. You are a nice guy, but business is business, and I want to win my old WBC belt back. I had a very bad night in the office against Ward but champions bounce back even stronger. I did that once after the Calzaghe fight and I will do it again when we get in the ring on the 24th of April.”

The two superstars concluded their international media tour this afternoon after flying from Billund to England on Tuesday evening. Froch admitted he has changed his mind about the city of Herning following yesterdays press conference at the MCH. “We were impressed by the venue,” he said. “The people have been great. It is a nice town and a superb arena. There are also two nice pubs out there so my fans will like it in Herning.”

Mick Hennessy was also impressed by Georg Soerensen and the hospitality at MCH. “It was a great trip and we were very pleased about everything. They treated us very well. It is the best possible venue for the fight and it can easily be reached for the Froch Army of Fans. Carl will be getting a lot of support on April 24. To me Froch vs. Kessler is a definite fight of the year candidate.”

Chris Meyer, General Manager of Team Sauerland, is convinced that Mikkel Kessler will bounce back stronger than ever before. “Carl is a good fighter but there is no way he can beat Mikkel with the Danish fans behind him,” he said. “It will be too much for Carl. Mikkel is stronger and the better fighter. He has a great coach, Jimmy Montoya, and they will come up with a brilliant plan to kill the Cobra.”

Montoya stated that Mikkel was getting better and better every day. “Training camp has been going very well,” he said. “Mikkel keeps telling me that he not only wants to become world champion again but win the whole tournament. That is exactly how he needs to look at things. He will definitely defeat Froch.”

The upcoming Group Stage 2 bout of the Super Six World Boxing Classic will be shown on Saturday, April 24th on Showtime at 9 ET/PM.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Amir Khan says Malignaggi bout is confirmed for May 15th! – News

By Eric Thomas: In his Twitter page, World Boxing Association light welterweight champion Amir Khan (22-1, 16 KO’s) says that his May 15th bout against former IBF light welterweight champion Paulie Malignaggi (27-3, 5 KO’s) is official at the Madison Square Garden, in New York, New York. In his Twitter page, the 22-year-old Khan says “Fights been confirmed for May 15th MSG against Malignaggi. Training starts from 6th March in LA. Want all my followers to follow me to NY.” This is marvelous news if you’re keen on a Khan-Malignaggi bout.

Although it is somewhat of a disappointment if you were hoping that Khan would face WBA light welterweight interim champion Marcos Maidana or 36-year-old WBO lightweight champion Juan Manuel Marquez. Either of those fights would have been much tougher fights for the 23-year-old Khan, mainly because Marquez and Maidana hit hard enough to stun or knockout Khan if they catch him with a good shot.

In the case of Maidana, he would be a constant threat for Khan for as long as the fight lasts, because even a glancing blow from the hard-hitting Maidana might be enough to sent Khan down for the count. However, Khan’s promoters Golden Boy Promotions don’t want to put Khan in with Maidana just yet, and are hoping to build up both fighters for a fighter perhaps in 2011 if both fighters continue to win.

There’s a good chance, however, that Khan and Maidana might never fight. Maidana is matched especially tough in his next fight compared to Khan, as he’s facing the unbeaten Victor Cayo on March 27th. Cayo (24-0, 16 KO’s) could outbox Maidana unless Marcos can break him down and take him out. If Cayo beats Maidana, he would be doing a huge favor for Khan, because Amir matches up a lot better against the crafty light hitting Cayo than he does against the hard hitting Maidana.

Khan has been skillfully matched up since being destroyed by knockout artist Breidis Prescott in 2008. In his last four fights – all of which Khan has won – he’s been matched up with soft punchers that post little threat to him. Khan picked up the WBA title against Andriy Kotelnik in July 2009.

Again, it was great match-making by putting Khan in with the light hitting Kotelnik rather than testing Khan against light welterweight champions Juan Urango and Timothy Bradley, both which would have likely knocked Khan out again. And then recently, instead of facing a mandatory fight against the knockout artist Maidana, Khan has been steered into a fight against Malignaggi, who poses little threat to Khan’s weak chin due to Malignaggi’s nonexistent power.

This will be Khan’s debut fight in the United States after having spent his entire career fighting in the UK. With any luck, Khan will look great against the 29-year-old Malignaggi and start the long process of winning over the casual boxing fans who only a scant knowledge about the sport.

They obviously will probably be impressed with Khan if he opens up his offense and shows his lightning quick combinations. Khan will have to get the go ahead to open up with his offense from his trainer Freddie Roach, who has bottled up Khan’s once impressive offensive skills since he started training the English fighter to keep him from getting hit so much
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Pound-for-Pound Crown: Part One

By Mark Ona: The honor of having the pound-for-pound title next to your name is a prestigious one. One that says, that no matter what weight class a boxer is in, he is considered to be the best boxer in all of the sport. Although the title might be considered fantasy (because we will never see a match between Klitshko and Mayweather), it is a legitimate one at that. I base my rankings on the belief that everyone’s pound-for-pound list is supported by these guidelines:

• Quality of opposition

• Win-Loss Record
• Overall Skill & Performance
• Title currently held

Obviously, the argument for the top spot is between Floyd “Money” Mayweather Jr. and Manny “Pac-man” Pacquiao. Because of all the controversy between both fighters about the blood testing issue, the only thing we can do at this point is debate on who the pound-for-pound title should belong to. Considering the principal standards that are stated above, I give my opinion on who should be regarded as the best boxer of our era.

I don’t believe that anyone can honestly argue with the set of skills that Floyd Mayweather Jr. has. Whether you favor his style or not, Mayweather Jr. possesses skills that have dominated the sport of boxing for a long time. His speed and accuracy, along with his (defense) ability to nullify any offense that his opponents attempts is remarkable. His style has often been disparaged by many of his critics as boring, because at times his fights may seem lackluster and uneventful.

Something we must understand as fans of the sport is that his style is one of the reasons he holds a record of 40 wins and no losses, and has won six world championships in five different weight classes. I, and I’m sure along with many others believe that the other reason he is 40-0 lies with his (the entire Mayweather camp) smart choice of opponents.

I have confidence that the opposition in the beginning of Mayweather Jr’s career was justified because of his obvious status, however, after his initial fight with Jose Luis Castillo I felt that his challengers have been tailored to compliment his style and continue his unblemished record. With so much controversy surrounding Mayweather Jr. and Mosley; or Mayweather Jr. and Paquiao about who is avoiding who, the bottom line is we will never truly know. I definitely commend Floyd on his wins over fighters like Diego Corrales, Zab Judah, Oscar De la Hoya even though I think most would agree that De la Hoya was 3+ years past his prime; and his second fight with Jose Louis Castillo because I felt that Castillo should have won their first bout.

We have also witnessed Mayweather Jr’s public announcements about whom he would like to face in future bouts, but the problem is that he hasn’t faced them yet. Floyd Mayweather Jr. has been blessed with a God-given talent that has brought him much success and praise; and right now he has the opportunity to go down in history as one, if not the greatest boxer of all time if he fights the top contenders of the sport. Unfortunately, until then, he cannot be labeled as the Pound-for-Pound best boxer in the world.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Pound-for-Pound Crown: Part Two

By Mark Ona: I believe that boxing supremacy lies in the gloves of its current WBO welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao. Like Mayweather Jr., Pacquiao began his professional career at 106 pounds, and in their own separate ways; both have consumed their opposition in imposing fashions. For Pacquiao, however, an impeccable archive of victorious wins did not follow as easily. His first loss came when he fought at 113 lbs losing a 12 round decision to his fellow countryman.

His second loss occurred three years later when he failed to continue after being floored by a third round knockout. Following his two early losses, Pacquiao tasted defeat only one other time. In the spring of 2005, Pacquiao adhered to a blood test two days before his fight with top contender Erik Morales, saying that it made him feel weak.

The unfortunate outcome for Pacquiao after this match was a 12 round unanimous decision victory for Morales. Deciding to never take a blood test that close to a fight ever again, the Filipino superstar went on to avenge that loss with a TKO victory in the tenth round of their second fight. In the third and much anticipated final bout of their trilogy, Pacquiao gave fans a phenomenal performance sending Morales to the canvas a total of three times and ending any hopes Morales had for a world title in the third round.

Pacquiao continued his reign in the super featherweight division with impressive wins over Jorge Solis, Juan Manuel Marquez, and future hall of famer Marco Antonio Barrera. After his fifth and sixth world titles, he decided to make history and face the WBO welterweight champion, and top pound-for-pound warrior Miguel Angel Cotto. This win marked the legacy of Manny Pacquiao’s illustrious career in the sport of boxing.

If we take into consideration the three boxers both Pacquiao and Mayweather fought, we must take the circumstances surrounding the fights into consideration as well. In Mayweather Jr. vs. Marquez, Mayweather Jr. showcased superb talent with a 12 round unanimous decision win against a fighter that has never fought above 135 lbs; only to appear at the weigh-ins two pounds heavier than their weight agreement and four pounds heavier than the lighter Juan Manuel Marquez. Pacquiao, rather, fought a 24 round war ending in a draw and a win. To his credit, Pacquiao is obviously not the same fighter he was when he clashed with Marquez in early 2008. If the two were to fight now, Pacquiao would only crush and end the Mexican fighter’s career.

In De La Hoya, Pretty Boy Floyd admissibly won a close 12 round split decision in 2007, only to retire avoiding any possible rematch that the Golden Boy had already demanded. While in 2008, Pacquiao dismantled the boxing legend not allowing him to advance past round eight. Though it was known that De La Hoya became dehydrated cutting down to 145 lbs. Pacquiao still rose two full weight classes above what was already considered to be too heavy for him at the time.

Hatton challenged Mayweather Jr. at 147 lbs, a weight class undeniably uncomfortable for the English boxer; considering that Hatton has only competed at 147 lbs. on one other occasion in his career. Hatton was completely outclassed before being knocked out in the tenth round. This fight, nonetheless, was another admirable performance by Floyd Mayweather Jr. As for the Filipino phenom, six minutes was a sufficient amount of time to beat his opponent. Before the sound of the bell in the second round, Pacquiao delivered to Hatton a left hook to the chin that paralyzed the Hitman for several minutes. This, once again, demonstrated the breed of big punchers that Pacquiao comes from.

The dictionary defines a champion as a person who has defeated all opponents in a competition. All of the greats: Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Leonard, Roy Jones Jr., and now Manny Pacquiao, have losses in their careers, yet they have confronted the best fighters in their respective weight classes. Pacquiao continues to amaze audiences with his style and his heart. He has already cemented his fellowship amongst the greatest boxers of all time. Before Floyd Mayweather Jr. can be crowned the undisputed pound-for-pound best boxer of our era, he must first beat the best boxers of our era, or he could just beat Manny Pacquiao!
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Vitali Klitschko Says He Plans To Make 2010 His Final Year In The Ring - Will He Bow

by James Slater - It has been reported by a number of sources that Vitali Klitschko announced yesterday how he plans to make the year we are now in, 2010, his final one in the boxing ring. Now aged 38 and having achieved everything in boxing he could have wanted apart from, A: having the satisfaction of shutting up David Haye, and, B: seeing to it that he and his brother Wladimir held the four unified heavyweight titles at the same time, Vitali feels the time is right to retire.

Currently in negotiations for a possible fight with former WBA ruler Nikolai Valuev, the reigning WBC king may well see this fight fall apart over money issues (Valuev promoter Don King has been asking for around twice as much money as Klitschko's promoters are willing to put up) and if this is the case, there will only be one big fight out there for "Dr. Iron Fist," - one with new WBA boss David Haye..

Vitali gave a short statement regarding his retirement plans yesterday:

"I only have to win one belt. So this year I will hang up my boxing gloves. And I'll stop visiting different cities to beat somebody's face in," Vitali said.

When the 38-year-old says he "only has to win one belt," I think he means, he only has to win the one belt that is not yet the property of he or his brother - the WBA belt. That means, then, that if Klitschko does intend to retire after he is safe in the knowledge that he and his brother own all the hardware there is to own in the heavyweight division, his final fight will be one with the trash-talking "Hayemaker." And what a huge fight this would be for Vitali to go out with.

After having had three quite long fights last year ( a total of 31 rounds of action), Vitali could very well afford to wait until Haye has taken care of John Ruiz in April (assuming he does of course; if Haye loses, bang goes the mouth-watering clash with either Klitschko), and then take a fight with the Brit in the autumn or the winter. This fight would be far more intriguing one to the fans compared to Vitali against Valuev.

For his part, Haye has spoken of wanting to fight one of the two brothers after he's beaten Ruiz (which he says he will, by KO) and Vitali would no doubt love to end his career with this super-fight. And if Vitali were to beat Haye, thus silencing the man who has so annoyed he and Wladimir over the past year or so, his career would end on one enormously high note.

What does it matter that I feel Haye would actually defeat Vitali if he fought him this year? King Klitschko is sure he will smash Haye, and he may well do so in what turns out to be his final ring appearance. It sure would be a shame if Vitali retired BEFORE facing the exciting puncher from London.

It seems we can enjoy Vitali while he's still around, which may not be for too much longer as far as boxing goes.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Mayweather Sparring Session Inspired Steve O'Meara

Steve O’Meara says he has got nothing to fear ahead of the Prizefighter Light-Middleweights tournament - thanks to a sparring session with Floyd Mayweather Jnr.

Unbeaten O’Meara is one of eight boxers who will be trying to win three, three round bouts in one night to pocket the £32,000 prize money at the York Hall in Bethnal Green on Friday, February 26.

O’Meara claims he has been transformed as a fighter since sparring with American Mayweather, a former world champion at five weight divisions.

But the 26-year-old from West Drayton, who has won all of his ten fights since turning professional nearly two years ago, admits he was unhappy with his last fight against Stourbridge’s Kevin McCauley in September immediately after sparring with Mayweather.

O’Meara blames jetlag after getting back from working with Mayweather in Las Vegas on under-performing against McCauley and is determined to show what he has learnt in front of the Sky Sports cameras.

He said: “I sparred with Floyd Mayweather in August and then came back to fight in September, but it was too soon after the flight and I was still jet-lagged when I got in the ring.

“It was great sparring with Floyd. My trainer Jimmy McDonnell set it up over in Las Vegas and the experience was unbelievable. Floyd will be remembered as one of the all time greats and I learnt so much, but it wasn’t easy.

“When I went to touch gloves at the start he banged me and I realised it wasn’t going to be fun and games. But the spar was good and my trainer said I did really well. Afterwards Floyd came over and shook my hand and wished me luck with my career.

“Now it doesn’t matter who I fight they won’t be as good as Floyd Mayweather so that spar gave me a lot of confidence.

“But I probably took me eye off the ball and didn’t give my opponent enough respect when I got back to England that week. The fight was only four days after I got back and I just had no energy and couldn’t do anything.

“Floyd Mayweather didn’t hit me as much as Kevin McCauley did that night so there was definitely something up.

“I can’t complain with how it has gone so far but there’s still a lot to come and I wasn’t happy with my last fight.”

O’Meara, who works as a personal trainer away from the ring, knows one of the other light-middleweights in the knockout tournament as George Hillyard trains at the same gym.

O’Meara, who took up boxing after breaking his leg playing for semi-professional football side Uxbridge as a teenager, sees the Prizefighter as an opportunity to move his career onto the next level.

He said: “This is a chance to get me some great exposure, exposure on one night that I might not have got by boxing in another two years.

“This is a chance to propel me towards bigger titles. I’ve sparred with George Hillyard at my gym (The LA Gym in Loughton) but we haven’t done any ahead of this. We’re mates but if we have to meet it’s business.”

Prizefighter Light-Middleweights takes place at the York Hall, Bethnal Green, London and the full line-up is Prince Arron (Droylsden, Manchester), Danny Butler (Bristol), Martin Concepcion (Leicester), Brett Flournoy (Birkenhead, Merseyside), George Hillyard (Canning Town), Steve O'Meara (West Drayton, Middlesex), Bradley Pryce (Newbridge, Wales) and Neil Sinclair (Belfast).
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Ariza: Pacquiao's Performance Will Frighten Mayweather

By Mark Vester

During a recent conversation with Gareth Davies of The Daily Telegraph, Alex Ariza, Manny Pacquiao’s strength and conditioning coach, said a fight with Floyd Mayweather Jr. may never happen at all. Besides the bad blood between the fighters, there is also the bad blood between the promoters, and the sour taste left in the mouths of both sides after the prior negotiations fell apart.

“I really don’t think so [that the fight will happen]. I don’t think it will be anything to do with Manny and Mayweather in the end. I think it will come down to the relations between Bob Arum and Golden Boy. Bob Arum was seriously fed up of the messing for this fight – and wanted to get it signed,” Ariza said.

“They don’t want to mess around with Mayweather. I think for him it is a case of whether he humbles himself and raises his position walks into Golden Boy’s offices and just signs the papers. There isn’t anything to say about it. If Mayweather wants the fight he is going to have to bite his tongue and go with whatever is stipulated in the contract.”

Ariza doesn't think Mayweather will want the fight. Especially after watching what Pacquiao does to Joshua Clottey on March 13 in Texas. Mayweather returns on May 1 against Shane Mosley.

“Will Mayweather do that [Fight Manny]? I think he won’t. Not once he sees what Manny does against Joshua Clottey. That’s going to instil even more fear into Mayweather.”
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Khan-Malignaggi Under Threat, Financial Standoff With HBO

By Rick Reeno

The negotiations for Amir Khan vs. Paulie Malignaggi have hit a wall with HBO. Talks continue to finalize Khan's American debut against Malignaggi for May 15 on HBO.

Multiple sources have advised BoxingScene.com that Khan's deal with Golden Boy Promotions guarantees him a minimum of over $1 million dollars from American television [not counting his British TV money]. Not only is Khan's HBO minimum a high number, it's actually higher than what most of the other HBO regulars receive.

HBO, from what I've heard, is unwilling to pay enough money to economically satisfy all of the financial factors involved, which include Khan's minimum, Malignaggi's purse and the televised co-feature between Victor Ortiz and Nate Campbell. If I had to estimate, this card will likely cost HBO between $2-3 million dollars. Talks are also ongoing to stage the event at the WaMu Theater in New York's Madison Square Garden, but industry insiders believe the economics involved will push the event to Las Vegas, Atlantic City or some other location that presents a better guarantee and/or upside.

When reached for comment, Malignaggi's promoter Lou DiBella would not discuss the specifics but confirmed there is no deal. He will continue negotiating with Golden Boy CEO Richard Schaefer over the next few days.

"The deal is not done. We are still negotiating," DiBella told BoxingScene.com.

The reality of everything is simple common sense. Khan, while talented, has absolutely no following or buzz in the United States. Khan needs Malignaggi more than Malignaggi needs Khan. He needs an opponent who is recognizable to the average HBO viewer. Malignaggi has appeared on HBO at least five times, and that doesn't include his televised fights on Showtime, Versus, and ESPN.

Khan's minimum is going to become a factor in future negotiations with just about any recognizable name. When you have a fighter who is recognizable with the American audience and has a certain level of notoriety, you have the option of taking the fight to pay-per-view if the television money is inadequate. Not in this situation because Khan is an unknown in the United States. It is going to be interesting to see if HBO puts up more money, or if Khan shifts some of his guaranteed money to make the event come together.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Ann Wolfe Talks James Kirkland, Laila Ali, Career, More

By Ishe Smith

BoxingScene.com was able to catch up with former professional prizefighter Ann Wolfe, who owns her own gym in Austin, Texas and does a lot of work with troubled youth. Once a fighter herself, Ann has now turned her attention into becoming the first female head trainer to guide a male fighter to a world championship.

Wolfe’s dream almost came true last year James Kirkland was on the verge of fighting for a world championship. Kirkland was one of boxing’s hottest commodity’s at the time, but his run was cut short when he was abruptly sent to prison for violating his parole in connection with a firearm purchase.

The incident has neither detoured nor devastated Ann one bit. She still puts in vast hours with countless kids and is on the verge of promoting a show in Austin on March 6th, at the Austin Music Hall with the proceeds going to her gym. Ann compiled a fantastic record of 24-1 with 16KOs. Many have wondered why a fight with Laila Ali never happened. Keep reading to get some insight into her goals, missions, and her pupil James Kirkland:

BOXINGSCENE.COM: What can you tell us about this Pro-Am boxing show you’re promoting on March 6th at the Austin Music Hall?

ANN WOLFE: It’s not like I am a promoter myself. I have a board and a bunch of people that are coming together, working with a lot of inner city kids who have a lot of problems. When I was moving James Kirkland, myself and Pops didn’t know how to get him fights. We had to go straight to somebody else. I got a lot of up and coming kids and I don’t want to have to go to somebody else. A lot these kids I have trained since they were eight to twelve years old, and now that they are twenty years old. I am not like a lot of coaches that find fighters as it is. The majority of the fighters that I have, I breed them since they were eight years old.

I was in the gym with Kirkland since he was twelve years old. Then I have to go out and take that fighter that I have been around or been with for 10 years and give them to somebody else. I figured at least I can do is get these people together and say let me show what I have done and what I got, before I take them to someone else and give them a bigger percentage than I have, when I am the one who took care of the kids, I fed them, take care of them, give them a place to stay, take them to school, and when it is time to move them I got to give them twenty or thirty percent because they know how to move them. I need to learn part of how to do that.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: Is this something you decided to do because of the ongoing politics in boxing, as far as promoting, and helping these kids out?

ANN WOLFE: Yea, I got one kid that I am getting ready to turn pro. He has like thirty amateur fights and ranked number three by USA boxing. He will become better in the pros. When we took Kirkland to the first person he was sixteen, seventeen years old, the promoter took him out from underneath me and pops, after that he didn’t do well for 3-5 years. I want to show the kids and show the big promoters that hey this kid is 5-0 look what this kid has did, so don’t com here telling me you need twenty percent or another manager saying they need thirty percent of the kid, in order for them to help me move the kid. I get so sick and tired of boxing that when you first start boxing you got pigeons and then you got real fighters. You have to go through fifteen pigeons and if you get one loss your career is almost over. That is so sad to me that in the boxing community if you have three losses they look at you like you’re nothing. That’s why I like Glen Johnson so much, he has thirteen losses, but he is number three in the world and keeps fighting like a champion. Its like you cannot have a loss, no one wants to touch, you become a journeyman - that’s crazy to me.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: Being that you were probably the best female fighter in the sport of boxing, how frustrated were you that you weren’t able to secure a fight with Laila Ali, the biggest female name in the sport?

ANN WOLFE: For me that wasn’t frustrating at all, not one bit, because when I started boxing, I boxed so I wouldn’t go to prison, I boxed to stay off the streets. I needed something to do to guide me as far as keeping me off the streets. I liked to fight anyway because after both my parents died, I really needed something to keep me occupied. So my goal was never to win a title. My goal was never to become the best. I don’t even consider myself the best.

I wanted to do what I can do the best way I knew how to do it, so when I put them gloves on I did it my best, my mother always told me, whatever you do, I don’t care what it is, whatever it is you choose to do you try to do it the best that you can do, so that is what I did. Sometimes being a world champion and you know this as a fighter; you’re not always the best, I rather be the best than to be known like Laila. For instance Laila can keep the recognition, I’d rather be known as one of the toughest. I will take that because I still have that street in me, that old school mentality; I’d rather die with my soul, than to sell my soul to the devil and live like a king. So in all honesty it didn’t frustrate me at all, I think she is more frustrated because she never got to fulfill what people knew she was incapable of.

I would have beaten the living hell out of Laila, and I think she knows that.
Now somebody said Laila mentioned that I was scared, and I had my tail between my legs, all I can say is that people who know me, knows there is nothing about me having my tail between my legs. Right now I am almost forty years old, why didn’t you fight me when I was thirty, why didn’t you fight me when I was twenty-five, what people don’t know is that I am in this gym every single day for two-three hours a day for over fifteen years. When you were here training that is how we train all the time. My body cant take that no more. I would say my prime is out the window, I want to fight some exhibitions to raise some money for my gym.

Right now my ability is to change lives, not to win a belt, and God put something inside me to really truly want to save these kids. It’s not about boxing for me; it’s not about winning titles for me, that’s why they wonder how I can train the way that I can because when I go to tournaments I take fifteen kids and come back with thirteen gold. Why? Not because I am a woman trainer, but because the kids can look in my eyes and can tell I want them to do the best that they can possible do, not just in boxing, but in school, in living, in life, in everything they do; what the hell does it mean to be a world champion but be a assh**e, or be a dummy and no one likes you or cares about you and you never get to fulfill your life. How many children has Laila helped? I am not talking about that superstar BS. I am talking about getting in the streets, getting in the grind. Laila wasn’t willing to trade that dancing with the stars, jumping over the moon to fight Joe gorilla like me, and she wasn’t going to give that up to fight a dog like me.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: How is life as a trainer? Which do you like better, being a professional boxer, or being a boxing trainer?

ANN WOLFE: It’s kind of bitter sweet on both ends, because I have grown as a boxer, but you can see better as a trainer because you’re not in there getting hit, you want the kids do something so bad but they wont do it, so you have to come up with all different kind of ways to get that kid to do it. As a boxer I would just be able to do it. As a trainer I can’t; but there is a fulfilling you get as a fighter when you win that you don’t get as a trainer. As a trainer it’s like the fighter is driving the car but he is blind folded, and you’re telling him turn this way and turn that way, keep straight, so as a trainer it is more frustrating at times.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: What can you tell us about James Kirkland and how he is doing right now?

ANN WOLFE: I think James is doing decent, the bible says what a man sows, so shall he reap, I told James to do the time they gave to you, get that part out of the way and focus on being a man first and a boxer second. I think if James Kirkland put the focus on being a man first and a father he is going to come out and win a world championship. He was trying to become a world champion and still in the streets; learn how to be a man and a father first, this is going to help him to be able to settle down. James understands what he did was wrong, he knows he has a lot of people in his corner and he let a lot of people down, a lot of them. I haven’t dealt with a lot of promoters, and most who know me knows I tell it like it is, and I can honestly say that Oscar De La Hoya and Golden Boy Promotions went above and beyond for James.

Oscar came down here and testified to do everything in his power to help James, they don’t know if he is going to come out and be the same, but they did everything in their power to help. Right know it’s up to James Kirkland; myself, Michael Miller, Cameron. We have done all we can. I cannot sit here and say what I think, I can say what I think he should do, I can’t tell you what I think he is going to do, cause I didn’t think he was going to do that, but I think he has learned his lesson.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: Were you disappointed when everything happened?

ANN WOLFE: To tell the truth, I wasn’t disappointed. I was disappointed when my mother and father died. What James done was life. It was like damn! We were so close, it was no more disappointing than if my daughter didn’t go to college and started acting crazy. My daughter is ranked number one right now by USA boxing. Sometimes in life you have disappointments, but sometimes its just life itself. I live my life for life, I was more disappointed in the decisions James made as a human being, even if it wasn’t any world titles or him going for any world titles, I would have been just as disappointed as if it was one of my amateurs, James is no different in my heart than any one of my amateurs who have more losses than they got wins. My heart goes out to them the same.

It was more hurting to the gym as a whole because he was part of a way for us to make it. He had the baton, it wasn’t like he was going to keep it, but right then and there he had it and dropped it, the whole crowd was like - he was right at the finish line and dropped the damn baton. That’s how I feel, you know you were capable of winning the race and you only lost because you dropped the baton - that’s what it felt like. I know that as a trainer I was capable of being the first female to take a male to a world title, as the head trainer, and I still know I am capable of doing that, I think everyone in the boxing world knows that I am capable of doing that.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: How often do you talk to him, what type of encouragement do you give him?


ANN WOLFE: Yea we communicate, I tell him he has to do his time; he is like any other man who is locked up, sometimes he is bitter, he knows he made a mistake and he has to do that time. I tell him to try to keep his weight down. He might be out in June and let’s pick up from there; I got some other fighters I am trying to move as well, James understands he can get out and make it.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: If he gets out with that same hunger and determination, do you think he can regain his top form and become a force at either 154 or 160:

ANN WOLFE: I say 154; one thing I think people don’t know about me, him, and us is that you got a lot of James Kirkland’s in my gym. The reason there is a lot of them in my gym is because we don’t spar, we fight, and you are going to start seeing them, we trim the fat, the majority of people leave because they can’t take that. James is always going to have that determination, if you see any of us, my daughter, myself, James, we all do, and that’s why we fight like that. There is something about James; he isn’t going to just let you beat him, and me being his coach, I am always thinking we are going to go tear their ass up.

Sometimes I would forget about the money, I’d be thinking about getting in your ass, and I know that is how he is because that is how Pops made all of us. In my gym if you get your ass whopped in sparring you’re going to get talked about until the next sparring session, it’s been like that since day one, so James is always going to have that determination regardless, anybody you see me in the corner with is going to be like that. It’s breaded inside his soul. If he settles down as a man, there is no doubt in my mind he is going to be a world champion.

BOXINGSCENE.COM: What would you like to say to the fans in closing before we get out of here and the possibility of a fight with yourself and Laila finally happening?

ANN WOLFE: I want to clear one thing up, Laila is the reason that we never fought, it was not because of me, and I want everyone to know that. Now with the injuries and surgeries, I am not the type of solider that would go to war with a knife and my opponent has a gun, I would be a fool to do that. In saying that I gave all that I had, and everyone who knows me knows I am not afraid of sh**; I am not scared of anyone. I could probably go in there the way I am now and knock Laila flat out on her ass. I believe Laila is physically scared of me, I have been around her, I don’t care what you say with your mouth. Laila is scared to lose, that’s why we never fought, so don’t think ever in your wildest dreams that Ann Wolfe is scared, I am not scared of nothing in this world, my greatest fear has already came to pass, my mother is dead.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Clottey: "Pacquiao First, Mayweather-Mosley Winner Next"

By Ryan Burton

Welterweight Joshua Clottey puts aside some time to speak with BoxingScene.com about his training camp to prepare for the biggest fight of his career. He faces WBO welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao on March 13 in Texas. Clottey says that everything is running very smooth and he is confident of victory in this exclusive interview. He also touches on the significance of this fight in his native Ghana, Mosley vs. Mayweather and more.

BoxingScene.com: How is training camp going so far?

Joshua Clottey: Everything is good. Everything is fine. We are working hard and just getting ready for the fight on March 13th.

BoxingScene.com: Are you looking good weight wise?

Joshua Clottey: Oh yeah. That won't be a problem. I train hard and always come in on weight. That is something I really haven't ever had a problem with.

BoxingScene.com: What exactly happened with your trainers not getting their visas?

Joshua Clottey: I can't really get down or be too disappointed about it. Life always has to go on and I still have to train. I guess these things happen for a reason. I am working hard and will be ready for the fight. I still have a good team around me and am confident I will come out victorious.

BoxingScene.com: How is sparring going? I assume your team found some short quick southpaws?

Joshua Clottey: Sparring is going just fine. I am sparring with these two guys, real good fighters but I can't remember their names. Both undefeated guys. We brought in one who is real fast and he is shorter so I can get ready for the speed and the other one is big and has the power to help me prepare.

BoxingScene.com: Obviously this is the biggest fight of your career. Most of the experts are picking Pacquiao to win. What do you have to do to make sure you come out with the win?

Joshua Clottey: I have all my plans and that is what I am training for right now. I need to practice them so I can execute them when I step in the ring. I have all my plans in my head. He and his team is saying they are going to knock me out and really I don't mind them saying that. They can say whatever they want to say. I already know in my head what I am going to do and how I am going to win.

BoxingScene.com: Pacquiao hasn't said much but I have read articles where Freddie Roach said that he thinks Pacquiao will knock you out. Do you feel they are disrespecting you?

Joshua Clottey: Well you know I am not taking it like they are disrespecting me or taking me lightly. I always feel like I am getting respect from Roach. Whenever I see him or have spoken to him he talked to me with respect. Whatever he says is fine by me. He is hyping up the fight you know. He has every right to talk. It is a free country and he can speak his mind and say what he wants to say.

BoxingScene.com: How big is this fight in your native Ghana? What is the buzz like there?

Joshua Clottey: Everybody back home is real excited about this fight. I told them that they shouldn't worry because we always are hoping and trying to improve our lives. We keep trying and good things will come. I am going to go out there and fight my best and try to come out with the win. I am confident and my people are confident.

BoxingScene.com: If you pull off the upset and come out victorious what do you want to do after that?

Joshua Clottey: If I win the fight and beat Manny Pacquiao, the number one pound for pound fighter ,my country will be so proud. I would like to fight the Mosley-Mayweather winner. You know one thing about me Ryan. I will fight anybody. If I win this fight I will be ready and willing to fight anybody.

BoxingScene.com: Paul Williams is still looking for an opponent. I know you wanted to fight him in the past. Would you fight him?

Joshua Clottey: If he wants to fight me I can fight him. I will fight anybody who wants to fight me.

BoxingScene.com: Who do you think wins the Mayweather vs. Mosley fight?

Joshua Clottey: It is a very tough fight. Shane Mosley is going to come out ready and hungry because he has wanted this fight for a long time. He has wanted a big fight for a long time. Now that he has one he will come in prepared and give Mayweather everything he has but Mayweather is a very smart guy who has a great defense and is a great boxer. This is a very tough one to call so I can't really pick a winner.

BoxingScene.com: Do you have a message for the fans?

Joshua Clottey: Well I just want to tell everybody that I am going to fight with the best fighter in the world and I am going to come in the ring prepared and do something that no one thinks I can do. That is the only thing I can say now. I have a plan and I will make it a good fight.
 
Jul 24, 2005
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Ivan Calderon-Johnriel Casimero Ordered By The WBO

By Rick Reeno

BoxingScene.com has heard that the WBO is ordering a fight between WBO junior flyweight champion Ivan Calderon and unbeaten interim-champion Johnriel Casimero (14-0, 8KOs). Casimero, a heavy handed Filipino hitter, blasted away on Cesar Chanchila last December. He knocked Canchila down several times before stopping him. The WBO wants both sides to begin negotiations as soon as possible