2nd Chance Scratchers/Lottery

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May 7, 2013
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www.hoescantstopme.biz
#3
Somebody has to win but it won't be me. If you have fun playing them and only play them with money you can afford to lose, have at it. I prefer card games. At the end of the day, that's all it should be about with these types of things. What bugs the effect out of me is that these casinos don't pay these card dealers shit in Vegas. Minimum wage plus tips? While the casino profits are reaped 365 days a year? That is bullshit.
 
Jan 29, 2005
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PHX
#4
I'll grab a scratcher or two every couple of months. I've probably won more than I've lost over the years. I notice I win more when I buy $5 or $10 ones instead of the $1 or $2 ones.

I don't mind the times I lose, here in Arizona for example all lotto revenue goes towards the state general fund that funds education, infrastructure improvements, etc. and a portion of it also goes towards social service programs. So at least the money goes towards something worthwhile.
 
May 31, 2006
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#5
my lady's sister's boyfriend's brother (yeah) won by entering on the Second Chance website from his ticket like last year. he won like $15,000. im sure he had to pay a tax on it but damn.. dude's kinda weird too, now he's hood rich and weird.
 
May 7, 2013
12,653
15,960
113
33°
www.hoescantstopme.biz
#6
I
I don't mind the times I lose, here in Arizona for example all lotto revenue goes towards the state general fund that funds education, infrastructure improvements, etc. and a portion of it also goes towards social service programs. So at least the money goes towards something worthwhile.
Kind of true, mostly not true though. From 1981 to 2015, the Az lottery had $11 billion in revenue. Only $3.5 billion was paid to government programs and funds- $1.8 billion over 35 years to voter decided programs, and $1.7 billion to the general fund over 35 years which legislature and governor have full control of and provide zero transparency on its spending.

From AZCentral in 2015:



1980: Arizona voters approved the creation of the Arizona Lottery by a narrow margin. Ballot literature promised proceeds would "pay for law enforcement, health services, education and other vital programs." But the original proposition wording required only that at least 30 percent of revenue go into the general fund.
1990: Voters required that $20 million in lottery revenue a year go into heritage funds for Arizona State Parks and the Arizona Game and Fish Department.
1993: Lawmakers required up to $23 million a year in lottery revenue to be put into a fund for local transit projects and up to $7.6 million a year to be divided among counties.
1996: Voters required that $17 million in revenue be spent annually on specific health and social-service programs, including teen-pregnancy prevention, food assistance for infants and mothers, and disease research.
2010: The Legislature borrowed against future lottery revenue, eliminated allocations to the counties and essentially cut in half lottery allocations to both the transportation fund and the heritage funds, sweeping nearly an extra $30 million a year into the general fund.
2015: The Legislature allocated $900,000 a year in lottery revenue to the Internet Crimes Against Children Enforcement Fund, $100,000 to the Victims' Rights Enforcement Fund and up to $160,000 a year to the tribal college dual enrollment program.

Where The Money Really Goes
An Arizona Republic analysis of 35 years of Arizona Lottery revenue and disbursements found that about $1.8 billion in lottery revenue has gone to the specific programs voters and lawmakers designated.
Local transportation projects got $782 million; economic development efforts got $201 million; the Game and Fish Department Heritage Fund, which supports outdoor recreation and protects critical wildlife, got $384 million; health and welfare programs like teen-pregnancy prevention and food assistance for children and mothers got $219 million; the Court Appointed Special Advocates program for foster children got $39 million; homeless shelters got $8 million; a state program for problem gamblers got $3.6 million; and a program to help law-enforcement agencies fight internet crimes against children.

As annual lottery revenue has grown over the years, the money allocated to these programs has remained relatively stagnant due to limits the Legislature and voters set.
Transportation programs got less in 2015 than they did in 1982. Counties for years got $7.6 million a year, but since 2011 have gotten nothing. The Game and Fish Department Heritage Fund got $10 million in 2015, compared with the $20 million a year it got during the 1990s and 2000s. Programs for economic development, health and welfare, foster-care advocates, homeless and gambling addiction have remained stagnant for decades.

The real winner in Arizona's lottery game has been the general fund.

Who Really Controls The Money?

The Arizona Legislature has directed more money into the state's general fund over the years.

The lottery, overseen by a five-member, governor-appointed commission and an executive director, controls the marketing. But it's the Legislature that has taken control of where the revenue is allocated.

As lottery revenue has grown and disbursements to specific programs have shrunk or remained stagnant, the Legislature has directed more money into the state's general fund, where it is impossible to track how specific dollars are spent. That revenue might have gone to schools and public-welfare programs as lawmakers promised and the Lottery markets on its website, or it might have gone to private prisons and lawmaker pensions.

The general fund over the past 35 years has received $1.7 billion.
In fiscal 2015, $72 million — 9.7 percent of the lottery's $750 million in annual revenue — went directly to programs touted to voters. Another $103 million went into the general fund. That compares with 19 percent going to designated programs in both 2005 and 1995.
Before the recession, the general fund received about $30 million a year. Over the past several years, the annual allocation has topped $100 million. This year, that trend is expected to continue.
 
Dec 3, 2016
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#7
Somebody has to win but it won't be me. If you have fun playing them and only play them with money you can afford to lose, have at it. I prefer card games. At the end of the day, that's all it should be about with these types of things. What bugs the effect out of me is that these casinos don't pay these card dealers shit in Vegas. Minimum wage plus tips? While the casino profits are reaped 365 days a year? That is bullshit.

Yeah true. Actually people give me their scratchers with no winnings in it. I just scan the barcode on the bottom on the ca lottery app to submit for second chance. Been doing it since last year and no results lol. So i was just wondering if anyone ever won shit. Yeah casinos are scumbags. I assume they at least pay the money handlers decent, because it lessens the chance of stealing.