Rick Ross concert in KC review by the pitch..

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KCMEX

Sicc OG
Aug 22, 2005
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:siccness:

Rick Ross, with Soulja Boy, Monica, and Ron Ron
Sprint Center
Sunday, February 27, 2011
Better than: This shitty weather, English food, and 50 Cent

I never know what to expect from a live hip-hop show. Of course, like with any live show, you want a unique experience that can't be translated in the thousands of smeary cell-phone videos that show up on YouTube. Ideally, you'll come away from a performance with something that can't be found on an album -- or, in Rick Ross' case, only a Greenscreen photo booth that places you with the artists in question in a photo. (Seriously. I could have had Ross' visage cheaply Photoshopped with a picture of me for only $25!)

Hip-hop, arguably, already has a handicap in this stance: the use of prerecorded material, sometimes complete with vocal tracks, which can limit the uniqueness of the live event. Of course, the same is true with any established rock band with well-worn material. In theory, it shouldn't matter. If it sounds good (and if it feels good, if it looks good and if you get something from it), then it has some value. That means that much of the show's merit rests on the personality of the performer. If there's a muffled, overblown sound system, or an unenthused artist waiting until the next track click to move on, it can make for a unique experience for all the wrong reasons.

And so I tried to approach last night's roster of hip-hop talent (and Monica?) with an open mind and fresh ears. Despite the inevitable cropping up of a few of the issues I mentioned above, nuggets of performances stood out.

First things first: Soulja Boy. A chart-topping young-'un whose commercial cachet is dwindling, Soulja looked every bit ridiculous -- but not in a good way -- as any one of his fun-toting music videos would suggest. Both of my friends, who accompanied me, and I thought it was weird that this super-successful artist was pushed to the bottom of the bill as the first opener, in front of local artist Ron Ron. (Indicative of something? Maybe, maybe not.) Soulja gave what's best described as a modest performance, giving hits like "Superman" "Crank That" and "Pretty Boy Swag" the occasional zesty twist.

But midway through his abbreviated set, during one his walks across the stage, Soulja looked directly toward my seating area, and I saw nothing but forced, fake energy in his body and a tired, desperate look in his face. He looked like a tired circus creature, parading through his cage, looking for attention. This was also demonstrated in his flat vocals and awkward motions to commence his famous dance.

Ron Ron and his crew, representing KC's local hip-hop scene, gave fiery performances that were only bogged down by technical issues and lyrics misremembered (unless that was part of a skit). But Ron attacked the set hard and fast with an aggressive energy that wasn't there in the previous performer. Ron Ron even brought a surprise guest, frequent collaborator and Top City hip-hop standout Stik Figa, for a few songs. The local boys' performance had a scruffy and ramshackle feel, which matched their hard-hitting style.

Like the rest of the performers, Ross' set felt especially abbreviated, and this was further heightened by how much time Ross let his collaborators take the stage, presumably filling in the verses on his tracks rapped by others. (I say presumably because from where I was sitting, it was hard to make out actual intelligible voices amid the scuzzy sound system).

When he was on the stage, Ross was positively commanding, not only for his eye-catching image (big beard, big body, sunglasses) but also for his famous booming, baritone voice. Hits like "Hustlin'" were throttled out his body with vigor -- even if, as with Soulja Boy, there was an element of rote duty to his performance.

Between songs, Ross tried to wax philosophical to the Kansas City audience, offering advice about following your dreams and not believing your naysayers, which was wrapped up in his thug musings: "When it comes to setting life goals, set the bar super-high." (During his short advice sessions, he certainly tried to pimp a back story of a hard street life into a successful music career, even though that's not entirely true for the man behind the glasses.)

There's certainly something skeezy about the way Ross ascended into hip-hop stardom when he tried to hide his past as a corrections officer. While street cred matters to some, for pop-rap artists like Ross', what really matters is the fiction they're selling, the characters they're creating, and the imaginary worlds they're populating.

Sometimes, the strains of these fictions show. While Ross was energetic enough to rile up the crowd, there wasn't as much risk-taking as I'd hoped, like I'd seen from Ron Ron and his crew. Ultimately I think what I expected was recklessness -- an unhinged interpretation of songs played to death on the radio and at parties. Or a sense that, even though these were fictions, bound and codified, there was something more to them. Instead, the top bill gave a predictable, absolutely mediocre performance.

Overheard in the Crowd:
"YOU ARE NOT A STAR."
"This ain't St. Louis. THIS IS KANSAS CITY, MOTHERFUCKA!!!" Indeed.
 
May 2, 2002
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So...I'm guessing the concert sucked? Why am I not surprised? Cause the way they were hypin' it up on the radio made it seem like it was gon' be the concert of the year! LMFAO
 
May 20, 2006
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So...I'm guessing the concert sucked? Why am I not surprised? Cause the way they were hypin' it up on the radio made it seem like it was gon' be the concert of the year! LMFAO
when i saw the local BET commercials, that was a bad sign......

whenever KPRS is the sole method of promo....guaranteed failure

a snowy, sunday in KC for a rap concert..... nail in the coffin
 
Oct 2, 2006
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From what I was seeing on facebook statuses the night of the concert it didn't sound like it was a very good turnout. Someone at the concert posted. "There are 1,500 ppl here. The Sprint Center holds 19,500"
 
May 2, 2002
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when i saw the local BET commercials, that was a bad sign......

whenever KPRS is the sole method of promo....guaranteed failure

a snowy, sunday in KC for a rap concert..... nail in the coffin
Don't think I saw the commercials very often(if at all). THANK GOD!

They tried, I'll give'em that. Bless their heart, lol. They sure as hell hyped it like it was gon' be the best shit on the radio. Shit, who else would've promoted it, 96.5 The Buzz, 95.7 The Vibe, Mix 93.3? LOL Kool Wayne don't even fuck wit Officer Ricky, so I doubt he would have either.

Yeah, this ain't exactly concert-going weather.

I wonder how many people are pissed that they spent money on that?:knockout:
 
May 2, 2002
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Not gonna lie, I liked Rick Ross when he first came out. That all went to shit after I found out he was a correctional officer at one time. The fact the he raps about hustlin' and he used to be a C.O. just seems ass backwards to me. Its all entertaiment, so at the end of the day, it really doesn't matter. LMFAO @ all the people who spent money on that concert though.
 
Oct 15, 2004
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#13
Aye thanx for postin this. I got sicc the day after the concert and I'm just now seeing and hearing some of the feedbacc from that night.

I was a little bummed out (honestly) just cuz I wanted everything to go right. And no that wasn't a skit I actually fucced up real quicc but you see how my dude bounced right in like it never happened.

That's why I love this shit.

Cuz for a few hundred people in that building that really know wsup, that was the best night ever. Str8 up.

I wouldn't recommend doing it like that again but all in all my niggaz kicced it, and had the chance to see another side to this shit

Much love and thanx again

It's just gettin bigger and bigger on mammas